Fiction

  • Rock Reject

    By Jim Williams     August 2012

    Winner of the inaugural Beacon Award for Social Justice Literature.

    Learn More
    A Roseway Book
  • The Year We Became Us

    A Novel About the Saskatchewan Doctors Strike

    By Gary Engler     May 2012

    The Year We Became Us is a novel about the 1962 Saskatchewan doctors’ strike as seen through the eyes of a 12-year-old boy and a 13-year-old girl. Roy, the son of a union activist, is a committed socialist and the best Little League pitcher in the entire province. Katherine, the daughter of a surgeon, has fallen in love with two novels by Ayn Rand and aspires to be just like her. Both are forced to write letters to President Kennedy as punishment for always arguing politics in their Grade 8 class at Saint Michael’s Catholic School in Moose Jaw. Part romance, part adventure and part political philosophy, this historical novel moves between1960s Moose Jaw and present-day Boston and follows Roy and Katherine as they revisit their letters to President Kennedy forty years later.

    Learn More
  • Chasing Freedom

    By Gloria Ann Wesley     August 2011

    Young Adult Historical Fiction

    Learn More
    A Roseway Book
  • Drive-by Saviours

    By Chris Benjamin     September 2010

    Chris Benjamin masterfully, magically weaves together the seemingly disconnected worlds of Mark, a failed social-worker-turned-unhappy-grant-writer coming to the end of an even unhappier relationship, and Bumi, an Indonesian illegal immigrant on the run from his past and the ocd that dogs his present. Their chance encounter on a Toronto subway launches them on a complicated friendship that allows both men to finally confront the demons in their pasts and to find the hope in their futures. – Stephen Kimber, author of Reparations

    Learn More
    A Roseway Book
  • How the Cougar Came to be Called the Ghost Cat/Ta’n Petalu Telui’tut Skite’kmujewe

    By Michael James Isaac  Illustrated by Dozay (Arlene) Christmas     September 2010

    This beautifully illustrated book, written in both Mi’kmaw and English, reflects the experiences of First Nations peoples’ assimilation into the Euro-Canadian school system, but speaks to everyone who is marginalized or at risk.

    Learn More
    A Roseway Book
  • Deep Roots

    By Kathleen Tudor     September 2009

    It’s the early 1950s, and Ira and Lydia Hardy, in their 70s, join their neighbours and large family to face the challenge of their lives. The government has chosen their fishing community for the construction of a provincial park. The community rallies against the plan, encouraged by Ira’s gentle and persistent efforts and those of his radical daughter Sal, home from college to help in the protest. Between lively gatherings in the family home in Collupy Point, Ira tramps across woodlands, picks flowers, cuts wood and, when the season begins, goes fishing. He and his three-year-old granddaughter Rosie become close friends, her amusing ways relieving the fear in his heart. When the first house in the village is torn down to make way for the park, the community persists despite little hope of success.

    Learn More
    A Roseway Book
  • The People and Josh Wilson

    By John Reid     September 2008

    Josh Wilson’s grade nine history project leads him stumbling into a parallel world where Native American people have not been displaced by colonists. Instead, the People thrive in a powerful domain and co-exist with small colonies in Massachusetts and New York. Josh has only a few days to find his way back to his own world. His journey among leaders of the colonists and the Mahican people is an action packed trip through an alternate history that inspires readers to question the past and rethink the present.

    A Roseway Book
  • Alice The Musical

    By Peter Oliver     January 2006

    Alice, The Musical is a classic tale of making theatre happen. In the inspiring words of Mickey Rooney (Babes in Arms, 1939), “Hey kids, let’s put on a show. We can do it, and we can do it here!” Or, in Lewis Carroll logic, “Don’t just do something! Stand there! Something may happen!” And something really did happen. In a small Nova Scotian town, over the past three years, a group of sixty-odd people has produced quality musicals in its new theatre converted from a shipbuilding shed. These people, of all ages, from all walks of life, turned a Victorian story about a little girl falling down a rabbit hole into a joyful moment of theatre magic. To quote an out-of-town visitor, “Imaging coming to a small town like this and experiencing something that should be seen Off-Broadway” This book contains the script of that show ad the story of how it came together and who some of the people were that made it happen. Both script and music are available free of charge to anyone who would like to make the magic happen.

    Learn More
    A Roseway Book
  • Back Talk

    Plays of Black Experience

    By Louise Delisle     January 2005

    “To read Delisle’s plays is to be sat right sown on the front stoop or round the kitchen table of Africadian fact. She puts us there, centre stage, right in the midst of the country-and-town reality of The People philosophizin, drinkin. singin, prayin, quiltin,laughin, gamblin, churchgoin, runnin, braidin hair, lovin, workin, fightin, talkin back to cops an such, and just keepin on keepin on. Delisle’s sociology is exactly who we be, so doncha get upset; her vision of our history is what we need to know, so pay attention. Ya gonna forget the Town of Shelburne passed a law “forbidding negro dances and frolics” in 1789? Naw, I say, naw…” –George Elliott Clarke, Poet & E.J. Pratt Professor of Canadian Literature, University of Toronto

    A Roseway Book
  • Among the Saints

    Selected Stories

    By Donna E. Smyth     January 2004

    “Donna E. Smyth – adventures with words; she is always doing something new and unique. Beginning with her visceral morality, her stories are startling, nerve wracking, provocative: she combines Angela Carter’s beautiful style with Patricia Highsmith’s malevolent atmospheres. Smyth shatters clichés and dismisses mere sociology. She knows that pleasure is besieged by terror. She tells us what we don’t want to know, but need to know. Smyth’s writing disturbs us, enrichingly, because truth can never be at peace with language.” –George Elliott Clarke, author of Execution Poems

    Learn More
    A Roseway Book