Labour & Unions

  • Precarious Employment

    Causes, Consequences and Remedies

    By Stephanie Procyk, Wayne Lewchuk and John Shields     Forthcoming December 2017

    This edited collection introduces and explores the causes and consequences of precarious employment in Canada and across the world.

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  • Migrant Workers and the City

    Generation Now

    By Huang Chuanhui  Foreword by Henry Veltmeyer  Translated by Anna Beare     September 2016

    In this refreshingly open and enlightening book we hear the stories and hopes for the future from the people who live in the basements of cities across China.

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  • Building a Better World, 3rd Edition

    An Introduction to the Labour Movement in Canada, 3rd Edition

    By Stephanie Ross, Larry Savage, Errol Black and Jim Silver     August 2015

    “Since it was first published, Building a Better World has been the best available book to introduce readers to unions in Canada. … With workers and unions facing increasingly severe attacks from employers and governments, this new version is most welcome.” — David Camfield, University of Manitoba, author of Canadian Labour in Crisis

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  • Continental Crucible, Expanded Edition

    Big Business, Workers and Unions in the Transformation of North America

    By Richard Roman and Edur Velasco Arregui  Preface by Mel Watkins  Foreword by Steve Early     June 2015

    This expanded edition examines developments in the offensive of North American big business, especially the blitzkrieg of constitutional reforms in Mexico in 2013–14. This crisis and its implications for the North American left and labour movements are explored in greater depth. This edition also includes new material from Leo Panitch and Steve Early, as well as the original preface by Mel Watkins.

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  • The Song of the Shirt

    Cheap Clothes Across Continents and Centuries

    By Jeremy Seabrook     April 2015

    Labour in Bangladesh flows like its rivers—in excess of what is required. Often, both take a huge toll. Labour that costs $1.66 an hour in China and 52 cents in India can be had for a song in Bangladesh—18 cents. It is mostly women and children working in fragile, flammable buildings who bring in 70 per cent of the country’s foreign exchange. Bangladesh today does not clothe the nakedness of the world, but provides it with limitless cheap garments — through Primark, Walmart, Benetton, Gap.

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  • Resources, Empire and Labour

    Crisis, Lessons and Alternatives

    Edited by David Leadbeater     September 2014

    The interconnections of natural resources, empire and labour run through the most central and conflict-ridden crises of our times: war, environmental degradation, impoverishment and plutocracy. Crucial to understand and to change the conditions that give rise to these crises is the critical study of resource development and, more broadly, the resources question, which is the subject of this volume.

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  • Public Sector Unions in the Age of Austerity

    Edited by Stephanie Ross and Larry Savage     August 2013

    For decades, public sector unions in Canada have been plagued by austerity, privatization, taxpayer backlash and restrictions on union rights. In recent years, the intensity of state-led attacks against public sector workers has reached a fevered pitch, raising the question of the role of public sector unions in protecting their members and the broader public interest.

    Public Sector Unions in the Age of Austerity examines the unique characteristics of public sector unionism in a Canadian context. Contributors to this multi-disciplinary collection explore both the strategic possibilities and challenges facing public sector unions that are intent on resisting austerity, enhancing their power and connecting their interests as workers with those of citizens who desire a more just and equitable public sphere.

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  • Climate@Work

    Edited by Carla Lipsig-Mummé     May 2013

    Climate change is having an increasingly significant impact on work in Canada, and the effect climate change has, and will continue to have, on work concerns many Canadians. However, this fact has not been seriously considered either in academic circles, in the labour movement nor especially by the Canadian government. Climate@Work addresses this deficit by systematically tackling the question of the impact of climate change on work and employment and by analyzing Canada’s conservative silence towards climate change and the Canadian government’s refusal to take it seriously.

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  • Continental Crucible

    Big Business, Workers and Unions in the Transformation of North America

    By Edur Velasco Arregui and Richard Roman     April 2013

    The crucible of North American neo-liberal transformation is heating up, but its outcome is far from clear. Continental Crucible examines the clash between the corporate offensive and the forces of resistance from both a pan-continental and a class struggle perspective. This book also illustrates the ways in which the capitalist classes in Canada, Mexico and the United States used free trade agreements to consolidate their agendas and organize themselves continentally.

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  • Negotiating Risk, Seeking Security, Eroding Solidarity

    Life and Work on the Border

    By Holly Gibbs, Belinda Leach and Charlotte Yates     September 2012

    Through a series of interviews with workers in the automotive parts industry, Negotiating Risk argues that the restructuring of labour markets and welfare states, paired with firm-level work and management reorganization, has exposed working-class families to greater levels of job risk and insecurity. Focusing on workers in Canada and Mexico and using a gender and race analysis, this book paints a bleak portrait of the lives of working people, where workers and their families continually renegotiate the effects of neo-liberal economic and social change. These changes see individuals working harder, longer and travelling further from home to keep their jobs, while straining familial and community relations and eroding the basis for worker solidarity and collective action.

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