Capitalism & Alternatives

  • The New Commune-ist Manifesto

    Workers of the World, It Really Is Time to Unite

    By Ernesto (Ernie) Raj Peshkov-Chow     July 2013

    If Marx were alive today and asked to write a new edition of The Communist Manifesto, how would it be different from the original, composed 165 years ago? The New Commune-ist Manifesto is an updated version of Marx’s original, written by an environmentally conscious working-class activist. While following the spirit of the old, this version is written for the twenty-first-century working class and transforms the original from a historical document into a call-to-action to build an economic system based on economic democracy and ecological sustainability.

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  • Resistance in the Age of Austerity

    Nationalism, the Failure of the Left and the Return of God

    By Owen Worth     June 2013

    In November 1999 the first protests associated with the anti-globalization movement took place in Seattle, and came to be seen as the starting point for globalized resistance to neoliberal capitalism. Despite initial optimism, the following years have seen little progress in formulating a coherent alternative to neo-liberalism, a failure that has become particularly poignant in the aftermath of the recent credit crisis. Now, the neoliberal mandate that appeared to be in crisis in just 2008 has reinvented itself through the guise of a new era of austerity.

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  • Critical Inquiries

    A Reader in Studies of Canada

    Edited by Lynn Caldwell, Darryl Leroux and Carrianne Leung     April 2013

    This book takes a bold, critical approach to Canadian studies, framing Canada as an ongoing colonial project. The contributors assess how policy programs, such as multiculturalism and national arts funding and cultural monuments and symbols, such as the Famous Five Monument, the Tunnels of Moose Jaw and Saskatchewan’s Centennial, are all shaped within this colonial matrix.

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  • From the Great Transformation to the Great Financialization

    On Karl Polanyi and Other Essays

    By Kari Polyani Levitt     April 2013

    Four years into the unfolding of the most serious economic crisis since the 1930s, Karl Polanyi’s prediction of the fateful consequences of unleashing the destructive power of unregulated market capitalism on peoples, nations and the natural environment has assumed new urgency and relevance. The system of unregulated or free market capitalism has a propensity towards crisis, which is reflected in both the dynamics of the Great Depression of the 1930s and the advent of the new world order of neoliberal globalization of the 1980s, ushering in “the great financialization.”

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  • Latin America’s Turbulant Transitions

    The Future of Twenty-First Century Socialism

    By M. Fox     March 2013

    Over the past few years, people in Latin America have started to turn towards radical left governments. Why has this shift taken place? What do we make of the relationships between the social movements and governments in these countries, and do the latter even qualify as “socialist” in reality?

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  • Geopolitical Economy

    After US Hegemony, Globalization and Empire

    By Radhika Desai     February 2013

    Geopolitical Economy radically reinterprets the historical evolution of the world order, as a multi-polar world emerges from the dust of the financial and economic crisis.

    Radhika Desai offers a radical critique of the theories of US hegemony, globalisation and empire which dominate academic international political economy and international relations, revealing their ideological origins in successive failed US attempts at world dominance through the dollar.

    Desai revitalizes revolutionary intellectual traditions which combine class and national perspectives on ‘the relations of producing nations’. At a time of global upheavals and profound shifts in the distribution of world power, Geopolitical Economy forges a vivid and compelling account of the historical processes which are shaping the contemporary international order.

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  • Cuba and Its Neighbours

    Democracy in Motion

    By Arnold August     January 2013

    In this groundbreaking book, Arnold August explores Cuba’s unique form of democracy, presenting a detailed and balanced analysis of Cuba’s electoral process and the state’s functioning between elections. By comparing it with practices in the U.S., Venezuela, Bolivia and Ecuador, August shows that people’s participation in politics and society is not limited to a singular U.S.-centric understanding of democracy. For example, democracy as practised in the U.S. is largely non-participatory, static and fixed in time.

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  • Socialist Register 2013

    The Question of Strategy

    By Greg Albo, Vivek Chibber and Leo Panitch     November 2012

    Socialists today have to confront two realities – that they cannot avoid the question of reforms and a gradualist path out of capitalism; and that the organizational vehicles for socialism will most likely have to abide by different structures and principles than those that dominated left politics in the twentieth century. Which features of past organizational models should be retained? And which discarded? Socialist Register 2013 seeks to explore and clarify strategy for the Left, in the light of new challenges, and new opportunities.

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  • Socialist Register 2012

    The Crisis and The Left

    Edited by Greg Albo, Vivek Chibber and Leo Panitch     December 2011

    As the crisis continues to bite deeper into the lives of people around the world, The Socialist Register 2012: The Crisis and the Left considers how the Left has responded and asks if it can offer a viable alternative. Examining the crisis in a variety of geographic areas including Africa, Latin America, Europe and China, contributors explore many themes of crisis from finance to climate, oil and auto to poverty and over-accumulation.

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  • Remaking Scarcity

    From Capitalist Inefficiency to Economic Democracy

    By Costas Panayotakis     October 2011

    The dominant schools of neoclassical and neoliberal economics tell us that material scarcity is an inevitable product of an insatiable human nature. Against this, Costas Panayotakis argues that scarcity is in fact a result of the social and economic processes of the capitalist system. The overriding importance of the logic of capital accumulation accounts for the fact that capitalism is not able to make a rational use of scarce resources and the productive potential at the disposal of human society. Instead, capitalism produces grotesque inequalities and unnecessary human suffering, a toxic consumerist culture that fails to satisfy, and a deepening ecological crisis. Remaking Scarcity is a powerful challenge to the current economic orthodoxy. It asserts the core principle of economic democracy, that all human beings should have an equal say over the priorities of the economic system, as the ultimate solution to scarcity and ecological crisis.

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