Roseway Publishing

Roseway Publishing aims to publish literary work that is rooted in and relevant to struggles for social justice. We are interested in publishing works of fiction, creative non-fiction, biographies and other literary writing that has a social justice theme.

  • Everything Is So Political

    A Collection of Short Fiction by Canadian Writers

    Edited by Sandra McIntyre     May 2013

    Consisting of twenty short stories, this collection is proof that it is increasingly difficult, even impossible, for fiction not to be political. But make no mistake, the stories in this anthology are stories first: stories that are meant to be read, shared and enjoyed, but stories that will make you see things differently and question the world around you.

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    A Roseway Book
  • The Lost Teachings / Panuijkatasikl Kina’masuti’l

    Illustrated by Dozay (Arlene) Christmas  By Michael James Isaac     April 2013

    This engaging story, with beautiful illustrations by Dozay (Arlene) Christmas, allows the reader to reconnect to and understand the seven teachings and their meaning in relation to themselves and society as a whole. The Lost Teachings is a story about the importance of the seven teachings – wisdom, respect, love, honesty, humility, courage and truth – and how interconnected they are in achieving balance, harmony and peace for individuals and society as a whole.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Tailings of Warren Peace

    By Stephen Law     March 2013

    A corrupt mining company, repossessed gravestones, a man’s fractured past, mysterious notes posted to lampposts and murder deep in the highlands of Guatemala. In Tailings of Warren Peace, Stephen Law effortlessly weaves these elements into a powerful story of love and memory, exploring how the past haunts us and how solidarity can save us all. Mysterious, passionate and powerful, Tailings of Warren Peace shows us the interconnections that exist between us, transcending social class, culture and geography.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Sagkeeng Legends (Sagkeeng Aadizookaanag)

    Stories by John C. Courchene

    By Craig Fontaine     September 2012

    John C. Courchene was born in Sagkeeng First Nation in 1914, where he attended the Fort Alexander Indian Residential School. Courchene’s time in the residential school was short; his brothers, “Joejay” and Louis, took John out school so he could help them cut wood in the bush. While this helped John make a lifetime commitment to hard work, it also resulted in John being “illiterate” in the European sense of the word. In the ways of the forest and his native language, Anishanabemowin, however, John was far from illiterate. Sagkeeng Legends is a testament to John’s cultural literacy and a monument in the face of eroding Indigenous language and culture caused by centuries of colonization.

    Originally recorded by John’s wife, Josephine Courchene, in the early 1980s and reprinted here in both English and Anishanabemowin by Craig Fontaine, the stories in Sagkeeng Legends represent two pebbles where a mountain of knowledge once stood. Nonetheless, this book is an important act of preserving and reintroducing Indigenous language and culture to a new generation.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Rock Reject

    By Jim Williams     August 2012

    Winner of the inaugural Beacon Award for Social Justice Literature.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Chasing Freedom

    By Gloria Ann Wesley     August 2011

    Young Adult Historical Fiction

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    A Roseway Book
  • A Legacy of Love

    Remembering Muriel Duckworth, Her Later Years, 1996-2009

    By Marion Douglas Kerans     September 2010

    Muriel Duckworth passed away August 22, 2009 in her one hundred and first year. In the weeks that followed memorial services were held in Austin Quebec, Halifax, Montréal, Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver. People from across Canada recognized that her passing marked the end of an era and they wanted to not only remember her but to come together to be a part of her ongoing legacy of love. This book brings together stories from Muriel’s family and close friends from the past dozen years of her life. It is a collection of incredible tales of Muriel’s ability to reach out to people, her humour, her deep affection for her family, her ongoing activism and enduring political feistiness, her views on education, religion, death, war and love. The book is richly illustrated with photographs from Muriel’s later years.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Drive-by Saviours

    By Chris Benjamin     September 2010

    Chris Benjamin masterfully, magically weaves together the seemingly disconnected worlds of Mark, a failed social-worker-turned-unhappy-grant-writer coming to the end of an even unhappier relationship, and Bumi, an Indonesian illegal immigrant on the run from his past and the ocd that dogs his present. Their chance encounter on a Toronto subway launches them on a complicated friendship that allows both men to finally confront the demons in their pasts and to find the hope in their futures. – Stephen Kimber, author of Reparations

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    A Roseway Book
  • How the Cougar Came to be Called the Ghost Cat/Ta’n Petalu Telui’tut Skite’kmujewe

    By Michael James Isaac  Illustrated by Dozay (Arlene) Christmas     September 2010

    This beautifully illustrated book, written in both Mi’kmaw and English, reflects the experiences of First Nations peoples’ assimilation into the Euro-Canadian school system, but speaks to everyone who is marginalized or at risk.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Deep Roots

    By Kathleen Tudor     September 2009

    It’s the early 1950s, and Ira and Lydia Hardy, in their 70s, join their neighbours and large family to face the challenge of their lives. The government has chosen their fishing community for the construction of a provincial park. The community rallies against the plan, encouraged by Ira’s gentle and persistent efforts and those of his radical daughter Sal, home from college to help in the protest. Between lively gatherings in the family home in Collupy Point, Ira tramps across woodlands, picks flowers, cuts wood and, when the season begins, goes fishing. He and his three-year-old granddaughter Rosie become close friends, her amusing ways relieving the fear in his heart. When the first house in the village is torn down to make way for the park, the community persists despite little hope of success.

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    A Roseway Book