Doing Community Economic Development

Edited by John Loxley, Kathleen Sexsmith and Jim Silver  

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Challenging traditional notions of development, these essays critically examine bottom-up, community economic development strategies in a wide variety of contexts: as a means of improving lives in northern, rural and inner-city settings; shaped and driven by women and by Aboriginal people; aimed at employment creation for the most marginalized. most authors have employed a participatory research methodology. The essays are the product of a broader, three-year community-university research collaboration with a focus on the strengths and difficulties of participatory, capacity-building strategies for those marginalized by the competitive, profit-seeking forces of capitalism. no easy answers are offered, but many exciting initiatives with great potential are described and critically evaluated.

  • Community Development
  • Co-published with Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives–Manitoba
  • ISBN: 9781552662212
  • $38.95
  • January 2007
  • 264 Pages
  • For sale worldwide

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Contents

  • Introduction (Silver & Loxley)
  • The State of CED in Winnipeg (Loxley)
  • The Impact of Hydroelectric Development on Grand Rapids, Manitoba (Kulchyski & Neckoway)
  • Government Policy towards CED in Manitoba in the 1960s and 1970s (Fernandez)
  • Social Housing and CED Initiatives in Inner-City Winnipeg (Skelton, Selig & Deane)
  • Urban Aboriginal Community Development (Silver, Ghorayshi, Hay & Klyne)
  • Improving the Lives and Livelihoods of Women through Socially Transformative Practice (Amyot)
  • CED to Reduce Young Women’s Poverty and Poverty-Related Conditions (McCracken)
  • Moving Low-Income, Inner-city People into Good Jobs (Loewen & Silver)
  • Can Call Centres Contribute to Manitoba’s CED? (Guard)
  • Aboriginal Students and the Digital Divide (Deane & Sullivan)
  • Aboriginal Labour and the Garment Industry in Winnipeg (Weist & Willmott)
  • Aboriginal Employment in the Banking Sector in Manitoba (Sexsmith & Pettman)
  • Manitoba Alternative Food Production and Farm Marketing Models (Doucette & Koroluk)
  • Agricultural Land Trusts (Hamilton)
  • Economics for CED Practitioners (Loxley & Lamb)
  • Local Participation and Democratic State Restructuring (Sheldrick)
  • Reflections on Accomplishments and Challenges (Loxley & Silver)

Authors

  • John Loxley

    University of Manitoba

    John Loxley is Professor and former head of the Department of Economics at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg. He specializes in international finance, international development and community economic development, in particular alternatives to orthodox economic theory and policy. His distinguished career includes stints at Makerere University and the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, as well as service to the governments of Tanzania, Uganda, Madagascar, Mozambique, and Manitoba as economic advisor. Professor Loxley is the author of Debt and Disorder: External Financing for Development and the coordinator of the Alternative Federal Budget exercise in Canada.

  • Kathleen Sexsmith

    University of Oxford

    KATHLEEN SEXSMITH is studying international development at the University of Oxford.

  • Jim Silver

    University of Winnipeg

    Jim Silver is a professor and chair of the Department of Urban and Inner-City Studies at the University of Winnipeg. His research interests are in inner-city, poverty-related, and community development issues. His most recent book is Moving Forward, Giving Back: Transformative Aboriginal Adult Education

    (Fernwood 2013). Jim is a member of the Manitoba Research Alliance and the leader of the Housing and Neighbourhood Revitalization stream of its SSHRC Partnership project, “Partnering for Change: Community-Based Solutions for Aboriginal and Inner-City Poverty.”