Crime & Law

  • Abusing Power

    The Canadian Experience

    Edited by Susan C.  Boyd, Dorothy E. Chunn and Robert Menzies     January 2001

    Abusing Power: The Canadian Experience is a book about crime, law, power and social (in)justice. The contributors include academics, legal practitioners, journalists and social activists who have been studying and struggling for years against the abuse of power in myriad realms of Canadian life. This book represents the first systematic effort in this country to integrate a variety of topics related to power abuse into a single collection.

  • An Ideal Prison?

    Critical Essays on Women’s Imprisonment in Canada

    Edited by Kelly Hannah-Moffat and Margaret Shaw     January 2000

    Ten years after the publication of Creating Choices, a remarkable report on women’s imprisonment in Canada, this book sets out to reflect on attempts to reform prison. In a series of critical essays, the contributors stimulate reflection and discussion. They explore the effects of punishment and penality on women’s lives, the impact of feminist reforms on the lives of women in prison and the systemic barriers which limit change in the context of both provincial and federal prisons. Each of the authors has a personal and sometimes intimate knowledge of the recent history of women’s prisons in Canada. Taking Creating Choices as a starting point, these essays question the role of prisons in our society, the importance of taking account of gender and its intersection with race and class, and the problems of both weak feminist models and the co-optation of feminist ideals and Aboriginal spirituality by correctional systems.

  • Giving Youth a Voice

    By Christie Barron     January 2000

    This book challenges traditional theories and methods associated with the study of youth violence. It offers a fresh perspective by incorporating into the discourse the voices of youths speaking about their own experience of the justice system. The book underscores the ineffectual nature of current corrections programs which are prescribed to deal with youth violence.

  • The Westray Chronicles

    A Case Study in Corporate Crime

    Edited by Christopher McCormick     January 1999

    In this book authors from backgrounds as diverse as engineering to public relations are brought together to create a holistic picture of what happened at Westray. From an analysis of the geology of the underlying coal seam to an assessment of the difficulties of pinning legal responsibility on the company, the government or any of the managers, this book constitutes one of the few case studies of corporate crime in Canada. The contributors offer the reader challenging new ways to think about workplace disasters and occupational injuries. Each contributor brings their special expertise to bear in a way that makes complicated issues transparent to the most general reader. At the same time, footnotes and references guide the reader who desires more extensive information.

  • A Voice Unheard

    The Latimer Case and People with Disabilities

    By Ruth Enns     December 1998

    A Voice Unheard shows the positive options for Canadians with disabilities. It features parents, able-bodied and disabled, who see potential where others see only dark despair. It shows how the majority of people with disabilities know that death was not Tracy Latimer’s only option. Their voices are valid in the debate about Robert Latimer and disability and must be heard.

  • Canadian Critical Race Theory

    Racism and the Law

    By Carol A. Aylward     December 1998

    The growth of the Critical Race Theory genre began in Canada when scholars of colour in Canada began to articulate a dissatisfaction with the existing Canadian legal discourse which failed to include an analysis of the role that “race” and racism has played in the political and legal structures of Canadian society.

  • Aboriginal Fishing Rights

    Laws, Courts, Politics

    By Parnesh Sharma     January 1998

    This book examines the nature of aboriginal fishing rights before and after the Sparrow decision from a perspective of whether disadvantaged groups are able to use the law to advance their causes of social progress and equality. It includes interviews with the key players in the fishing industry: the Musqueam Indian Band, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the commercial industry. It concludes that aboriginal fishing rights remain subject to arbitrary control and examines why and how this has happened.

  • Crimes, Laws and Communities

    By John McMullan, David C. Perrier, Stephen Smith and Peter D. Swan     January 1997

    In this book, McMullan and his colleagues have provided much needed information and analysis on “unconventional” crimes by researching fire for profit, illegal fishing and business crime in Atlantic Canada. The three essays fill an information gap left by scant media reports, conflicting government statistics and, in the case of crimes of capital, wilfully concealed information.

  • Immigration and the Legalization of Racism

    By Lisa Jakubowski     December 1996

    “The chameleon-like nature of the law-the duplicitous ways in which the law is written, the equivocal way in which it is stated and, therefore, talked about, the hiding of the truth about the resources which are expended in its implementation, the misleading way in which it casts the discretions it purports to take away and to give-its ideological functioning and its capacity to legitimate the illegitimate, all are put under the microscope in this study. It is a timely piece of work. It may make some readers uncomfortable, but it will leave no one untouched.” -H.J. Glasbeek, Professor Emeritus, Osgoode Hall Law School

  • Women in Trouble

    Connecting Women’s Law Violation to their Histories of Abuse

    By Elizabeth Comack     January 1996

    This book addresses one of the more alarming findings to emerge about women in prison: the fact that 80 percent report histories of physical and sexual abuse.