PEI Guardian review of Tailings of Warren Peace

"Tailings of Warren Peace"  by Stephen Law (Roseway Publishing-Fernwood Publishing, $19.95.) works on several levelsthough it's written in plain clear English and could be read by any ordinary adult reader.  On one level it's a mysterywho is putting phrases of a narrative on slips of pink paper, and sticking them on lampposts?  And what is Magma Internationala gold-mining companyhiding?
On a second levelthis is the story of how Warren Peacefrom a mining family in Cape Bretonbut now living in Torontobecomes drawn into a group of activists, and eventually goes to Guatemala with one of them to see what they can find out about her sister.
And 
on a third levelthe novel is about Magmahow it operates, and what happens to people who want to find out more about it or even resist it.
All these levels are put together to make a coherentalmost prismaticstory.  And it's a frightening one, all the more because it's founded on fact.  Yet it's not sensational.  It's told in soberoften understated language.  The ending is ambiguousWarren is changed for the betterbut is still very much an activistMeenahis Indian girlfriendstruggles on with her legal inquiries; and Celinathe Guatemalan girlhas not decided whether to return to Canada or to stay on in her dangerous home.
One of the best novels of 2013. 

← Back to Tailings of Warren Peace