Constructing Danger

Emotions and Mis/Representation of Crime in the News (Second Edition)

By Christopher McCormick  

Paperback $34.95

Crime reporting is often thought to be simply an objective and factual description of an event. In Constructing Danger Chris McCormick argues that crime is more than simply reported: it is constructed. And sometimes it is distorted, exaggerated and manipulated in order to create certain impressions of and opinions about the world. Examining issues such as how misrepresentations of AIDS perpetuates harmful stereotypes, the underrepresentation of women in the news, the trivialization of sexual assault and the sensationalized focus on violent crime, this book challenges readers to approach the news with a more critical eye and to recognize how misrepresentations lead to a distorted perception of the world. Further, this book asks the reader to consider the consequences of holding this distorted vision, from increased surveillance and legislation to the normalization of violence.

  • Media & Culture
  • ISBN: 9781552663820
  • $34.95
  • September 2010
  • 240 Pages
  • For sale worldwide

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Contents

  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • A String of Strange Sexual Assaults: The Construction of an Orthodox Account of Rape
  • Women Who Work as Prostitutes: The Sex Trade and Trading in Labels
  • Domestic Terrorism: The News as an Incomplete Record of Violence Against Women
  • The Mount Cashel Orphanage Inquiry:  The Inscription of Child Abuse
  • Fiends and High Risk Groups: Misrepresenting and Signifying a Disease
  • The Halifax Race Riot: Extralocality and Racism in the News
  • Crime Rates and Crime Fear: Portraying Crime out of Control
  • Crime Stoppers and the Police: The Ideological Construction of Community
  • Lawyers and Serial Killers: The Press and Sensationalism
  • The Westray Mine Explosion: Covering a Disaster and a Failed Inquiry
  • Conclusion

Authors

  • Christopher McCormick

    St. Thomas University

    Chris McCormick teaches criminology at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick.