David Este

Professor at Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary

Dr. David Este is a Professor in the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Calgary. He has published in the areas of immigration; historical and contemporary experiences of people of African descent in Canada and mental health. In 2019, David was part of a team that received the Governor General’s Award in History for Community Programming for the documentary entitled, We Are the Roots: Black Settlers and Their Experiences of Discrimination on the Canadian Prairies. He also received from the Canadian Association of University Teachers’ Lee Lorch Award for excellence in teaching, research and service to the University of Calgary to the profession of social work, and to the community.

  • Racism and Anti-Racism in Canada

    Edited by David Este, Liza Lorenzetti and Christa Sato     August 2018

    This introductory book was planned and written specifically as an introduction to racism and anti-racism. It is conspicuously activist and advocates anti-racism within the parameters of sound academic research. The authors do not see a contradiction between strong research and calls to action to create a non-racist society.

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  • Race and Well-Being

    The Lives, Hopes and Activism of African Canadians

    By Akua Benjamin, David Este, Carl James, Bethan Lloyd, Wanda Thomas Bernard and Tana Turner     March 2010

    Through in-depth qualitative and quantitative research with African Canadians in three Canadian cities – Calgary, Toronto and Halifax – this book explores how experiences of racism, combined with other social and economic factors, affect the health and well-being of African Canadians. With a special interest in how racial stereotyping impacts Black men and boys, this book shares stories of racism and violence and explores how experiences and interpretations of, and reactions to, racism differ across a range of social and economic variables. Rejecting the notion that Black communities are homogeneous, this book gives a detailed examination of three distinct communities: Caribbean, immigrant African and Canadian Black. The authors also explore how individuals, families and communities can better understand and challenge racism.

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