Roseway Publishing

Roseway Publishing aims to publish literary work that is rooted in and relevant to struggles for social justice. We are interested in publishing works of fiction, creative non-fiction, biographies and other literary writing that has a social justice theme.

  • Drive-by Saviours

    By Chris Benjamin     September 2010

    Chris Benjamin masterfully, magically weaves together the seemingly disconnected worlds of Mark, a failed social-worker-turned-unhappy-grant-writer coming to the end of an even unhappier relationship, and Bumi, an Indonesian illegal immigrant on the run from his past and the ocd that dogs his present. Their chance encounter on a Toronto subway launches them on a complicated friendship that allows both men to finally confront the demons in their pasts and to find the hope in their futures. – Stephen Kimber, author of Reparations

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    A Roseway Book
  • How the Cougar Came to be Called the Ghost Cat/Ta’n Petalu Telui’tut Skite’kmujewe

    By Michael James Isaac  Illustrated by Dozay (Arlene) Christmas     September 2010

    This beautifully illustrated book, written in both Mi’kmaw and English, reflects the experiences of First Nations peoples’ assimilation into the Euro-Canadian school system, but speaks to everyone who is marginalized or at risk.

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  • Deep Roots

    By Kathleen Tudor     September 2009

    It’s the early 1950s, and Ira and Lydia Hardy, in their 70s, join their neighbours and large family to face the challenge of their lives. The government has chosen their fishing community for the construction of a provincial park. The community rallies against the plan, encouraged by Ira’s gentle and persistent efforts and those of his radical daughter Sal, home from college to help in the protest. Between lively gatherings in the family home in Collupy Point, Ira tramps across woodlands, picks flowers, cuts wood and, when the season begins, goes fishing. He and his three-year-old granddaughter Rosie become close friends, her amusing ways relieving the fear in his heart. When the first house in the village is torn down to make way for the park, the community persists despite little hope of success.

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    A Roseway Book
  • The Guy in the Green Truck

    John St. Amand – A Biography

    By James N. McCrorie     August 2009

    Few mature men and women choose to abandon secure employment with handsome health and retirement benefits for a cause and an uncertain future. This biographical memoir is about a man who did just this, abandoning a promising career as a sociologist at Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, for the turbulent life of union organizer in Nova Scotia.

    In one of his first organizing campaigns, John St. Amand crisscrossed industrial Cape Breton signing up workers to the new Canadian Miner’s Union and became known as “the guy in the green truck.” Archie Kennedy, a miner who worked with John, said, “It is difficult for ‘mainlanders’ to penetrate the culture of Cape Breton and to be accepted by Cape Bretoners as one of their own. John St. Amand did exactly that.” He had a great ability to communicate with people.

    St. Amand’s life became a testament to those who choose to advance the cause of the underdog in the hope of building a better society for us all. This book is a tribute to a courageous fighter who worked tirelessly to bring hope and justice to those most oppressed and neglected in our society. His courage, daring, incorrigible sense of mischief and his dedication to working men and women all combined to banish any thought of defeat in the face of lost campaigns.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Pubs, Pulpits and Prairie Fires

    By Elroy Deimert     August 2009

    History professor Paul Wessner hangs out at BJ’s Bar and Cue Club on Tuesday nights sharing his accounts of the On-to-Ottawa Trek and the Regina Riot in 1935. Due to local interest in his research, he invites Doc Savage and Matt Shaw, real-life leaders on the Trek, to deliver first-hand accounts of the Trek and the Riot. He encourages listeners to contribute when no guests are scheduled to tell their stories. The narratives broaden to the evolution of the Social Credit and CCF prairie fires and their lasting legacies in Canada. Great Depression police tactics are compared to the repression of dissent at the Battle of Seattle and the Quebec Summit of the Americas. The audience at BJ’s Bar end up on their own odysseys, discovering that they are actually a part of the narratives that are shared on Tuesday nights. Paul’s own journey pulls both the readers and his weekly pub colleagues into the middle of the living oral history.

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    A Roseway Book
  • The Hundefraulein Papers

    Poems

    By Kathy Mac     May 2009

    Hunde/fräulein: Dog/nanny. For five and a half years (1995-2001) Kathy Mac lived in Sambro Head, NS, looking after anywhere from four to twelve English Setters. The post entailed maintaining the ocean-side doghouse and looking after the many, varied houseguests of the hundemutter – ocean activist Elisabeth Mann Borgese, youngest daughter of Thomas Mann. These poems take their tone from the days and dogs that inspired them – by turns extravagant, intense, celebratory, wistful.

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    A Roseway Book
  • The People and Josh Wilson

    By John Reid     September 2008

    Josh Wilson’s grade nine history project leads him stumbling into a parallel world where Native American people have not been displaced by colonists. Instead, the People thrive in a powerful domain and co-exist with small colonies in Massachusetts and New York. Josh has only a few days to find his way back to his own world. His journey among leaders of the colonists and the Mahican people is an action packed trip through an alternate history that inspires readers to question the past and rethink the present.

    A Roseway Book
  • Accidental Opportunities

    A Journey Through Many Doors, An Autobiography

    By Bridglal Pachai     January 2007

    Bridglal (Bridge) Pachai, a life long advocate of social justice, was born in a thatched roof cottage in Umbulwana, South Africa. His journey has taken him from South Africa to Halifax, Nova Scotia. Along the way he has taught history at universities in South Africa, Malawi, The Gambia and Halifax. He has also served as director of the Black Cultural Centre in Nova Scotia and as director of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. In the words of Tom McInnis, his senior when Bridge was director of the Human Rights Commission, he could “dance with the lords and be with the paupers.”

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    A Roseway Book
  • Alice The Musical

    By Peter Oliver     January 2006

    Alice, The Musical is a classic tale of making theatre happen. In the inspiring words of Mickey Rooney (Babes in Arms, 1939), “Hey kids, let’s put on a show. We can do it, and we can do it here!” Or, in Lewis Carroll logic, “Don’t just do something! Stand there! Something may happen!” And something really did happen. In a small Nova Scotian town, over the past three years, a group of sixty-odd people has produced quality musicals in its new theatre converted from a shipbuilding shed. These people, of all ages, from all walks of life, turned a Victorian story about a little girl falling down a rabbit hole into a joyful moment of theatre magic. To quote an out-of-town visitor, “Imaging coming to a small town like this and experiencing something that should be seen Off-Broadway” This book contains the script of that show ad the story of how it came together and who some of the people were that made it happen. Both script and music are available free of charge to anyone who would like to make the magic happen.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Back Talk

    Plays of Black Experience

    By Louise Delisle     January 2005

    “To read Delisle’s plays is to be sat right sown on the front stoop or round the kitchen table of Africadian fact. She puts us there, centre stage, right in the midst of the country-and-town reality of The People philosophizin, drinkin. singin, prayin, quiltin,laughin, gamblin, churchgoin, runnin, braidin hair, lovin, workin, fightin, talkin back to cops an such, and just keepin on keepin on. Delisle’s sociology is exactly who we be, so doncha get upset; her vision of our history is what we need to know, so pay attention. Ya gonna forget the Town of Shelburne passed a law “forbidding negro dances and frolics” in 1789? Naw, I say, naw…” –George Elliott Clarke, Poet & E.J. Pratt Professor of Canadian Literature, University of Toronto

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    A Roseway Book