Health & Illness

  • Venezuela’s Health Care Revolution

    By Chris Walker     February 2015

    Established under late Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez, Misión Barrio Adentro (MBA) — Venezuela’s adaptation of the Cuban social medical model — utilizes a free, universal health care system to serve and educate rural, poor and marginalized populations and to broaden the very praxis and ideology of what health means in a true Latin American social medicine approach. MBA moves beyond conventional medicine to form a true community-oriented primary care system

  • Decolonizing Trauma Work

    Indigenous Stories and Strategies

    By Renee Linklater  Foreword by Lewis Mehl-Madrona     May 2014

    In Decolonizing Trauma Work, Renee Linklater explores healing and wellness in Indigenous communities on Turtle Island. Drawing on a decolonizing approach, Linklater engages ten Indigenous health care practitioners in a dialogue regarding Indigenous worldviews, notions of wellness and wholistic health, critiques of psychiatry and psychiatric diagnoses, and Indigenous approaches to helping people through trauma, depression and experiences of parallel and multiple realities.

  • Accumulation and Constraint

    Biomedical Development and Advanced Industrial Health

    By Rodney Loeppky     February 2014

    Accumulation and Constraint examines the dynamic world of advanced industrial health, exploring it as a means to better understand the internal differences in biomedical development (pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices) and health care reform, delivery and restructuring.

  • Reproducing Women

    Family and Health Work across Three Generations

    By Diana L. Gustafson and Marilyn Porter     September 2012

    How do women experience reproductive health? How is knowledge about health issues transmitted from one generation to the next? Utilizing sociological and feminist lenses, Reproducing Women argues that women experience reproductive health as a part of their entire life story, rather than as discrete medical “problems.” Drawing together stories and interviews with three generations of women across twenty-four families, this book examines women’s experience of their “reproductive lives” in order to uncover how women’s experience is rooted in the family and among generational relationships: between mother, daughter, grandmother and granddaughter. By placing women’s biological and embodied experiences, including issues such as menarche, contraception, sexual intercourse, childbirth and menopause, in a social and cultural context, women’s broader roles in ‘social reproduction’ are revealed.

  • The Year We Became Us

    A Novel About the Saskatchewan Doctors Strike

    By Gary Engler     May 2012

    The Year We Became Us is a novel about the 1962 Saskatchewan doctors’ strike as seen through the eyes of a 12-year-old boy and a 13-year-old girl. Roy, the son of a union activist, is a committed socialist and the best Little League pitcher in the entire province. Katherine, the daughter of a surgeon, has fallen in love with two novels by Ayn Rand and aspires to be just like her. Both are forced to write letters to President Kennedy as punishment for always arguing politics in their Grade 8 class at Saint Michael’s Catholic School in Moose Jaw. Part romance, part adventure and part political philosophy, this historical novel moves between1960s Moose Jaw and present-day Boston and follows Roy and Katherine as they revisit their letters to President Kennedy forty years later.

  • Disability Politics and Theory

    By A.J.  Withers     January 2012

    An accessible introduction to disability studies, Disability Politics and Theory provides a concise survey of disability history, exploring the concept of disability as it has been conceived from the late 19th century to the present. Further, A.J. Withers examines when, how and why new categories of disability are created and describes how capitalism benefits from and enforces disabled people’s oppression. Critiquing the model that currently dominates the discipline, the social model of disability, this book offers an alternative: the radical disability model. This model builds on the social model but draws from more recent schools of radical thought, particularly feminism and critical race theory, to emphasize the role of intersecting oppressions in the marginalization of disabled people and the importance of addressing disability both independently and in conjunction with other oppressions. Intertwining theoretical and historical analysis with personal experience this book is a poignant portrayal of disabled people in Canada and the U.S. – and a radical call for social and economic justice.

  • The Ancient Mariner Speaks

    Examining Regimes of Truth in ADHD

    By Marion Stordy     January 2012

    The number of children labelled ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) has been on the increase since the term entered common medical parlance thirty years ago. Through a deeply personal narrative and an analysis of Michel Foucault’s theories on truth, power and knowledge, The Ancient Mariner Speaks argues that the ADHD label has contributed to the pathologizing of children’s, particularly boys’, behaviour and the further marginalization and exclusion, rather than inclusion, of students in the classroom.

  • Behind the Rhetoric

    Mental Health Recovery in Ontario

    By Jennifer Poole     April 2011

    Recovery has taken the mental health world by storm. In clinics, hospitals, community organizations and governments across North America and Europe, recovery rhetoric is everywhere. Its message of hope is catchy, its promise of wellness long overdue and its claims (somewhat) substantiated. But where did this new vision for mental health come from and what does it really mean for a system long unbalanced? Focusing on Ontario’s mental health communities, the book is the first to take a critical look at recovery’s talk and texts. Using Foucault’s analyses of discourse, it is also the first to go behind recovery’s rhetoric of hope and responsibility, re-theorizing mental health recovery in Canada.

  • False Positive

    Private Profit in Canada’s Medical Laboratories

    By Ross Sutherland     February 2011

    When your doctor takes a blood sample for analysis, where does it go? Does it find its way to your local, publicly owned hospital? Does it take a longer journey to a private, for-profit lab in the next city? Chances are, you’ve never given it a lot of thought. In this daring exposé of the laboratory system, Sutherland investigates its historical and contemporary development in Canada and argues that the landscape has been heavily influenced by the private, for-profit companies – to the detriment of the public health care system.

  • My Baby Rides the Short Bus

    The Unabashedly Human Experience of Raising Kids with Disabilities

    Edited by Yantra Bertelli, Jennifer Silverman and Sarah Talbot     September 2010

    In lives where there is a new diagnosis or drama every day, the stories in this collection provide parents of “special needs” kids with a welcome chuckle, a rock to stand on, and a moment of reality held far enough from the heart to see clearly. Featuring works by “alternative” parents who have attempted to move away from mainstream thought–or remove its influence altogether–this anthology, taken as a whole, carefully considers the implications of parenting while raising children with disabilities.