Food

  • Food Regimes and Agrarian Questions

    By Philip McMichael     August 2013

    Philip McMichael explores the relationships between contemporary food, energy, climate and financial crises and food regime restructuring, which includes agrofuels, land grabbing, the bioeconomy, agro-security mercantilism and the food sovereignty movement.

  • Peasants and the Art of Farming

    A Chayanovian Manifesto

    By Jan Douwe van der Ploeg     May 2013

    Many impressive studies on the changing nature of the global food system have been published, and nearly all address changes at the macro level. The far less visible changes occurring at the micro level have received relatively little attention, especially in the realm of critical rural studies. This book is a reflection of the far reaching and complex transformations of food systems that have occurred as a result of liberalization and globalization.

  • Hungry for Change

    Farmers, Food Justice and the Agrarian Question

    By A. Haroon Akram-Lodhi     January 2013

    “A must-read for anyone who cares about understanding food and the planet today.” – Raj Patel

  • Food Sovereignty in Canada

    Creating Just and Sustainable Food Systems

    Edited by Annette Aurélie Desmarais, Nettie Wiebe and Hannah Wittman     September 2011

    Contemporary Canadian agricultural and food policies are contributing to the current global food crisis: the industrialized, high-input, export-driven agricultural production sector, coupled with concentrated corporate processing and retailing, are ecologically unsustainable, increasingly unaffordable, unhealthy and socially unjust. Employing an interdisciplinary and multi-sectoral approach, Food Sovereignty in Canada explores how communities all over the country are actively engaged in implementing alternative agricultural and food models within the framework of food sovereignty – taking control over food-producing resources, markets and agricultural policy. This framework offers Canadian citizens, researchers and policymakers the opportunity to build alternative agricultural and food models that are less environmentally damaging and that keep farmers on the land while ensuring that those living in cities have access to healthy and safe food. Achieving food sovereignty requires conceptual and practical changes, reshaping menus, farming, communities, relationships, values and policy, but, as the authors clearly demonstrate, the urgent work of building food sovereignty in Canada is well under way.

  • Class Dynamics of Agrarian Change

    By Henry Bernstein     September 2010

    Agrarian political economy investigates the social relations of production and reproduction, property and power in agrarian formations, and how they change. Using Marx’s theory of capitalism the book argues that class dynamics should be the starting point of any analysis of agrarian change.

  • Food Sovereignty

    Reconnecting Food, Nature and Community

    Edited by Annette Aurélie Desmarais, Nettie Wiebe and Hannah Wittman     September 2010

    Advocating a practical, radical change to the way much of our food system currently operates, this book argues that food sovereignty is the means to achieving a system that will provide for the food needs of all people while respecting the principles of environmental sustainability, local empowerment and agrarian citizenship. The current high input, industrialized, market-driven food system fails on all these counts. The UN-endorsed goal of food security is becoming increasingly distant as indicated by the growing levels of hunger in the world, especially among marginalized populations in both the North and South. The authors of this book describe the recent emergence and the parameters of an alternative system, food sovereignty, that puts the levers of food control in the hands of those who are both hungry and produce the world’s food - peasants and family farmers, not corporate executives. As the authors show in both conceptual and case study terms, food sovereignty promises not only increased production of food, but also food that is safe, food that reaches those who are in the most need, and agricultural practises that respect the earth.

  • Edible Action

    Food Activism and Alternative Economics

    By Sally Miller     September 2008

    Hunger is up, obesity is up, food-borne illness is up, farms are lost to debt and despair; the food system fails growing numbers of people across the world every day. Yet if we adjust our lens, we see ubiquitous commitments to change: food movements and enterprises dedicated to making the world a better place to eat and to live. Food initiatives–from farmers’ markets to fair trade coffee–offer a pattern of powerful alternatives to conventional food economics, which benefit only a handful of people and corporations. Edible Action argues that food is peculiarly situated to address the ills of an unjust economic system and to mobilize people against it.

  • Our Board Our Business

    Why Farmers Support the Canadian Wheat Board

    Edited by Darrell McLaughlin and Terry Pugh     January 2007

    Our Board Our Business is based on presentations made to a symposium on the Canadian Wheat Board organized by the National Farmers union held in Regina, Saskatchewan, February 24 and 25, 2006. The central purpose of the book is to help farmers and non-farmers better understand the essential role of the CWB in the lives of western wheat producers and their communities, and the Canadian economy. The need for such an understanding has been made all the more urgent by Prime Minister Harper’s neo-liberal open market agenda which will guarantee corporate domination of Canadian grains. This book, like the symposium from which it is drawn, does not debate the advantages and disadvantages of the CWB. Rather, it sets out the context, operational mechanism, and role of the CWB, in order to make the case for its economic, social, and political value.

  • The Global Food Economy

    The Battle for the Future of Farming

    By Tony Weis     January 2007

    The modern food industry is a paradox: surplus “food mountains” sit alongside global malnutrition; the developed world subsidized its own agriculture while pressurizing the developing to liberalize at any cost; and an increasingly aggressive export competition is accompanied by a growing reliance on imports in many countries. The WTO’s uneven application of neoliberal economics to food production is relatively new, and the consequences of mounting deficits, rising “food miles” and social upheaval are untested but ominous. In response to this, Weis sets out some answers to the central question: how can we build a sustainable and humane system of food production and distribution?

  • La Vía Campesina

    Globalization and the Power of Peasants

    By Annette Aurélie Desmarais     December 2006

    In 1993, 46 farm leaders from various countries met in Mons, Belgium, determined to develop a strategy to challenge the devastation caused to their communities by a neoliberal international economic agenda. Over the next decade they and millions of peasants and small-scale farmers around the world used La Vía Campesina to forge a powerful and radical force of opposition. Where did they find the capacity and strength to challenge multinational agribusiness corporations and international institutions whose power and influence increasingly dictate national government policy? This book accompanies La Vía Campesina in a struggle to keep people on the land, producing food and culture, and building viable communities.