Book Search

  • Series: The Basics
  • Aboriginal Fishing Rights

    Laws, Courts, Politics

    By Parnesh Sharma     January 1998

    This book examines the nature of aboriginal fishing rights before and after the Sparrow decision from a perspective of whether disadvantaged groups are able to use the law to advance their causes of social progress and equality. It includes interviews with the key players in the fishing industry: the Musqueam Indian Band, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the commercial industry. It concludes that aboriginal fishing rights remain subject to arbitrary control and examines why and how this has happened.

  • When the Fish Are Gone

    Ecological Collapse and the Social Organization of Fishing in Northwest Newfoundland, 1982-1995

    By Craig T. Palmer and Peter R. Sinclair     January 1997

    The Gulf Coast fisheries off Northwest Newfoundland provide a graphic example of the social and biological consequences of the failure to create conditions that would allow for fishing on a sustainable basis. This book shows how an ecological crisis has produced a social crisis threatening the viability of fishers, the fish plants where they sold their fish, and the communities in which they live. It is set in the context of the North Atlantic fisheries and of primary resource producing rural areas in mature capitalist societies.

    Learn More
  • Crimes, Laws and Communities

    By John McMullan, David C. Perrier, Stephen Smith and Peter D. Swan     January 1997

    In this book, McMullan and his colleagues have provided much needed information and analysis on “unconventional” crimes by researching fire for profit, illegal fishing and business crime in Atlantic Canada. The three essays fill an information gap left by scant media reports, conflicting government statistics and, in the case of crimes of capital, wilfully concealed information.

    Learn More
  • Immigration and the Legalization of Racism

    By Lisa Jakubowski     December 1996

    “The chameleon-like nature of the law-the duplicitous ways in which the law is written, the equivocal way in which it is stated and, therefore, talked about, the hiding of the truth about the resources which are expended in its implementation, the misleading way in which it casts the discretions it purports to take away and to give-its ideological functioning and its capacity to legitimate the illegitimate, all are put under the microscope in this study. It is a timely piece of work. It may make some readers uncomfortable, but it will leave no one untouched.” -H.J. Glasbeek, Professor Emeritus, Osgoode Hall Law School

  • The Politics of Community Services (second edition)

    Immigrant Women, Class and the State

    By Roxana Ng     January 1996

    “Students like it a lot. It is readable, although it offers a complex argument. It is practical and speaks to experiences that many (students) have had. It offers a model of what an empirical study using social organization of knowledge looks like.”-Marie Campbell, Social Work, University of Victoria

    Learn More
  • Banking on Deception

    The Discourse of the Fiscal Crisis

    By Thom Workman     January 1996

    Through the discourse of the fiscal crisis the proponents of the neo-liberal agenda deceive Canadians by presenting this agenda as the only rational alternative. Workman discusses the success of this appeal to common sense, analyzing how it resonates positively within the Canadian cultural context.

    Learn More
  • Strategies for the Year 2000

    A Women’s Handbook

    By Barbara Roberts and Deborah Stienstra     January 1995

    How well has Canada measured up to its obligations under the two agreements it signed during the UN Decade of Women? The authors of this book detail the terms of the conventions (the Convention for the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the Forward Looking Strategies for the Advancement of Women by the Year 2000) and have painstakingly chronicled the progress the provincial, territorial, and federal governments have made towards fulfilling their legal obligations in areas such as women’s participation in decision-making, childcare, violence against women and so on. All levels of governments are found wanting. As an assessment of progress on women’s equality in Canada, it is fascinating reading and a thorough resource.

    Learn More
  • Something’s Wrong Somewhere

    Globalization, Community and the Moral Economy of the Farm Crisis

    By Christopher Lind     January 1995

    “Recalling the fascinating history of rural protests in seventeenth to nineteenth century England, (Lind) argues that today’s crisis has as much to do with morals and ethics as with economics.”-Kim Cariou, People’s Voice

    Learn More
  • Politics on the Margins

    Restructuring and the Canadian Women’s Movement

    By Janine Brodie     January 1995

    “Janine Brodie’s thoughtful and insightful analysis of the impact of international restructuring on the women’s movement asks all the right questions. Her challenge to develop new strategies in the face of the destruction of the welfare state should be taken up by feminists everywhere.” - Judy Rebick

    Learn More
  • More Perishable than Lettuce or Tomatoes

    Labour Law Reform and Toronto’s Newspapers

    By Edward T. Silva     January 1995

    This book presents an in-depth analysis of the “unbalanced” treatment by the four largest Toronto dailies of the Ontario NDP’s 1992 proposed labour reform law.

    Learn More