Book Search

  • Topic: Crime & Law
  • Canadian Critical Race Theory

    Racism and the Law

    By Carol A. Aylward     December 1998

    The growth of the Critical Race Theory genre began in Canada when scholars of colour in Canada began to articulate a dissatisfaction with the existing Canadian legal discourse which failed to include an analysis of the role that “race” and racism has played in the political and legal structures of Canadian society.

  • Aboriginal Fishing Rights

    Laws, Courts, Politics

    By Parnesh Sharma     January 1998

    This book examines the nature of aboriginal fishing rights before and after the Sparrow decision from a perspective of whether disadvantaged groups are able to use the law to advance their causes of social progress and equality. It includes interviews with the key players in the fishing industry: the Musqueam Indian Band, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the commercial industry. It concludes that aboriginal fishing rights remain subject to arbitrary control and examines why and how this has happened.

  • Crimes, Laws and Communities

    By John McMullan, David C. Perrier, Stephen Smith and Peter D. Swan     January 1997

    In this book, McMullan and his colleagues have provided much needed information and analysis on “unconventional” crimes by researching fire for profit, illegal fishing and business crime in Atlantic Canada. The three essays fill an information gap left by scant media reports, conflicting government statistics and, in the case of crimes of capital, wilfully concealed information.

  • Immigration and the Legalization of Racism

    By Lisa Jakubowski     December 1996

    “The chameleon-like nature of the law-the duplicitous ways in which the law is written, the equivocal way in which it is stated and, therefore, talked about, the hiding of the truth about the resources which are expended in its implementation, the misleading way in which it casts the discretions it purports to take away and to give-its ideological functioning and its capacity to legitimate the illegitimate, all are put under the microscope in this study. It is a timely piece of work. It may make some readers uncomfortable, but it will leave no one untouched.” -H.J. Glasbeek, Professor Emeritus, Osgoode Hall Law School

  • Women in Trouble

    Connecting Women’s Law Violation to their Histories of Abuse

    By Elizabeth Comack     January 1996

    This book addresses one of the more alarming findings to emerge about women in prison: the fact that 80 percent report histories of physical and sexual abuse.

  • Undressing the Canadian State

    The Politics of Pornography from Hicklin to Butler

    By Kirsten K. Johnson     January 1995

    Through a detailed historical analysis of Canada’s obscenity legislation, Johnson argues that the state implicitly supports the ideology of pornography.

  • Rethinking the Administration of Justice

    Edited by Dawn Currie and Brian MacLean     January 1992

    This book analyzes different aspects of the administration of justice from the perspective of three emerging critical traditions of inquiry: Marxist political economy, feminist inquiry and discourse analysis.

  • Elusive Justice

    Beyond the Marshall Inquiry

    Edited by Joy Mannette     January 1992

    “The Marshall Commission Report does not deserve accolades. While it acknowledges errors, negligence and mismanagement, it did not make the connections necessary to begin the process of developing a dialogue about a justice system that Aboriginal people can respect, or which respects Aboriginal people.” - M.E. Turpel, Dalhousie Law School

  • Beyond the Limits of the Law

    Corporate Crime and Law and Order

    By John McMullan     January 1992

    McMullan attributes corporate crime to a process whereby the accumulation of capital takes precedence over human safety. He concludes that “the scope and seriousness of corporate crime is enormous, far exceeding that of conventional crime.”