Book Search

  • Topic: Crime & Law
  • About Canada: Corporate Crime

    By Laureen Snider      April 2015

    A primer on a topic rarely discussed in public debate: corporations who engage in both criminal and legal but socially harmful behaviours in their relentless pursuit of profit.

  • The Disappearance of Criminal Law

    Police Powers and the Supreme Court

    By Richard Jochelson and Kirsten Kramar     November 2014

    In The Disappearance of Criminal Law, Richard Jochelson and Kirsten Kramar examine the rationales underpinning Supreme Court of Canada cases that address the power of the police.

  • Indivisible

    Indigenous Human Rights

    Edited by Joyce Green     October 2014

    Drawing on a wealth of experience and blending critical theoretical frameworks and a close knowledge of domestic and international law on human rights, the authors in this collection show that settler states such as Canada persist in violating and failing to acknowledge Indigenous human rights.

  • Criminalizing Women, 2nd Edition

    Gender and (In)Justice in Neoliberal Times, 2nd Edition

    Edited by Gillian Balfour and Elizabeth Comack     September 2014

    Criminalizing Women introduces readers to the key issues addressed by feminists engaged in criminology research over the past four decades. Chapters explore how narratives that construct women as errant females, prostitutes, street gang associates and symbols of moral corruption mask the connections between women’s restricted choices and the conditions of their lives.

  • Threatening Democracy

    SLAPPs and the Judicial Repression of Political Discourse

    By Normand Landry     April 2014

    Threatening Democracy is an introduction to the phenomenon of judicial intimidation used against socially and politically active citizens. Strategic lawsuits against public participation (also known by the acronym SLAPP) involve the deliberate use of judicial procedures as tools for intimidation, censorship and political reprisal in the context of social and political debates.

  • Locating Law, 3rd Edition

    “Race/Class/Gender/Sexuality Connections

    Edited by Elizabeth Comack     February 2014

    Praise for the second edition: “This book is the best available for teaching the role of law in society and making sense of how it operates within the (inter)connections of race, class and gender dynamics often perpetuating oppression. … Locating Law is essential for undergraduate students in justice, sociology and criminology.” – Margot Hurlbert, University of Regina

  • “Indians Wear Red”

    Colonialism, Resistance, and Aboriginal Street Gangs

    By Elizabeth Comack, Lawrence Deane, Larry Morrissette and Jim Silver     August 2013

    “Indians Wear Red” locates Aboriginal street gangs in the context of the racialized poverty that has become entrenched in the colonized space of Winnipeg’s North End. Drawing upon extensive interviews with Aboriginal street gang members as well as with Aboriginal women and elders, the authors develop an understanding from “inside” the inner city and through the voices of Aboriginal people – especially street gang members themselves.

  • The Poetics of Land and Identity Among British Columbia Indigenous Peoples

    By Christine J. Elsey     April 2013

    The Poetics of Land and Identity is about the meaning of land for the many diverse First Nations within British Columbia. The work offers a study of the folklore and symbolic traditions within many Aboriginal regions and illustrates how these traditions emphasize the importance of orality and poetics as the defining factor in the value of land. Christine J. Elsey offers a deft, scholarly discussion of these “storyscapes,” providing us with a point of access for understanding First Nations’ perspectives on the world and their land. She provides an important alternative to the monetary, exploitative, resource-driven view of nature and land ownership and highlights the conflicts between the colonial, Western perspective of nature and the holistic view of First Nations people.

  • Racialized Policing

    Aboriginal People’s Encounters with the Police

    By Elizabeth Comack     March 2012

    Policing is a controversial subject, generating considerable debate. One issue of concern has been “racial profiling” by police, that is, the alleged practice of targeting individuals and groups on the basis of “race.” Racialized Policing argues that the debate has been limited by its individualized frame. As well, the concen- tration on police relations with people of colour means that Aboriginal people’s encounters with police receive far less scrutiny. Going beyond the interpersonal level and broadening our gaze to explore how race and racism play out in institutional practices and systemic processes, this book exposes the ways in which policing is racialized.

  • Thinking About Justice

    A Book of Readings

    Edited by Kelly Gorkoff and Richard Jochelson     March 2012

    How do we think about justice? Is it an act? An ideology? A philosophy? We are divided in our understandings of justice between those who seek fundamental social change versus those who seek incremental change and between those who argue that justice exists versus those who think it is a ruse – between internal and external perspectives. However, a promising axis of scholarship aimed at bridging these divides is emerging. Thinking about Justice introduces readers to these three ways of thinking about justice in a variety of contexts including prisons, policing, the courts, youth crime, Aboriginal people, the media, poverty and work in the sex industry. Ultimately, Thinking about Justice seeks to embrace the potentialities of justice, to explore the avenues through which justice seekers interact, debate and achieve some mode of cohesion and find a new, inclusive way forward.