Book Search

  • Topic: Crime & Law
  • Indivisible

    Indigenous Human Rights

    Edited by Joyce Green     October 2014

    Drawing on a wealth of experience and blending critical theoretical frameworks and a close knowledge of domestic and international law on human rights, the authors in this collection show that settler states such as Canada persist in violating and failing to acknowledge Indigenous human rights.

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  • Criminalizing Women

    Gender and (In)Justice in Neoliberal Times, 2nd Edition

    Edited by Gillian Balfour and Elizabeth Comack     September 2014

    Criminalizing Women introduces readers to the key issues addressed by feminists engaged in criminology research over the past four decades. Chapters explore how narratives that construct women as errant females, prostitutes, street gang associates and symbols of moral corruption mask the connections between women’s restricted choices and the conditions of their lives.

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  • Threatening Democracy

    SLAPPs and the Judicial Repression of Public Discourse

    By Normand Landry     April 2014

    Threatening Democracy is an introduction to the phenomenon of judicial intimidation used against socially and politically active citizens. Strategic lawsuits against public participation (also known by the acronym SLAPP) involve the deliberate use of judicial procedures as tools for intimidation, censorship and political reprisal in the context of social and political debates.

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  • Locating Law, 3rd Edition

    “Race/Class/Gender/Sexuality Connections

    Edited by Elizabeth Comack     February 2014

    Praise for the second edition: “This book is the best available for teaching the role of law in society and making sense of how it operates within the (inter)connections of race, class and gender dynamics often perpetuating oppression. … Locating Law is essential for undergraduate students in justice, sociology and criminology.” – Margot Hurlbert, University of Regina

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  • Indians Wear Red

    Colonialism, Resistance, and Aboriginal Street Gangs

    By Elizabeth Comack, Lawrence Deane, Larry Morrissette and Jim Silver     August 2013

    “Indians Wear Red” locates Aboriginal street gangs in the context of the racialized poverty that has become entrenched in the colonized space of Winnipeg’s North End. Drawing upon extensive interviews with Aboriginal street gang members as well as with Aboriginal women and elders, the authors develop an understanding from “inside” the inner city and through the voices of Aboriginal people – especially street gang members themselves.

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  • Keeping the Land

    Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug, Reconciliation and Canadian Law

    By Rachel Ariss     March 2012

    When the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug’s traditional territory was threatened by mining explora- tion in 2006, they followed their traditional duty to protect the land and asked the mining exploration company, Platinex, to leave. Platinex left – and then sued the remote First Nation for $10 billion. The ensuing legal dispute lasted two years and eventually resulted in the jailing of community lead- ers. Ariss argues that though this jailing was extraordinarily punitive and is indicative of continuing colonialism within the legal system, some aspects of the case demonstrate the potential of Canadian law to understand, include and reflect Aboriginal perspectives. Connecting scholarship in Aboriginal rights and Canadian law, traditional Aboriginal law, social change and community activism, Keeping the Land explores the twists and turns of this legal dispute in order to gain a deeper understanding of the law’s contributions to and detractions from the process of reconciliation.

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  • Racialized Policing

    Aboriginal People’s Encounters with the Police

    By Elizabeth Comack     March 2012

    Policing is a controversial subject, generating considerable debate. One issue of concern has been “racial profiling” by police, that is, the alleged practice of targeting individuals and groups on the basis of “race.” Racialized Policing argues that the debate has been limited by its individualized frame. As well, the concen- tration on police relations with people of colour means that Aboriginal people’s encounters with police receive far less scrutiny. Going beyond the interpersonal level and broadening our gaze to explore how race and racism play out in institutional practices and systemic processes, this book exposes the ways in which policing is racialized.

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  • Thinking About Justice

    A Book of Readings

    Edited by Kelly Gorkoff and Richard Jochelson     March 2012

    How do we think about justice? Is it an act? An ideology? A philosophy? We are divided in our understandings of justice between those who seek fundamental social change versus those who seek incremental change and between those who argue that justice exists versus those who think it is a ruse – between internal and external perspectives. However, a promising axis of scholarship aimed at bridging these divides is emerging. Thinking about Justice introduces readers to these three ways of thinking about justice in a variety of contexts including prisons, policing, the courts, youth crime, Aboriginal people, the media, poverty and work in the sex industry. Ultimately, Thinking about Justice seeks to embrace the potentialities of justice, to explore the avenues through which justice seekers interact, debate and achieve some mode of cohesion and find a new, inclusive way forward.

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  • Pursuing Justice

    An Introduction to Justice Studies

    Edited by Margot Hurlbert     September 2011

    This book is about justice: its definition, its boundaries, its contradictions, its nuances. It is also about pursuing justice and the mechanisms and practices that enable this pursuit. But justice is a tricky topic – just defining it is daunting. There are diverse and competing philosophies about what justice is, as well as several theoretical approaches to justice studies. Adding to the complexity, justice is played out within many social contexts and issues: the Canadian justice system, the environment (including climate change), the perspective of women (including their contact with the criminal justice system), the law surrounding equality, paid labour , poverty, the marginalization and colonization of Aboriginal people and the oppression of racial minorities. Pursuing Justice problematizes the notion of justice through an exploration of these contexts and issues, all while defining and pursuing the illusive notion of justice in Canadian society. Adopting a three-pronged approach that distinguishes between formal justice, substantive justice and ethical practice, Pursuing Justice offers a multidisciplinary exploration of a breadth of issues related to the pursuit of social justice, legal justice and restorative justice. Each chapter contains questions, case studies and a glossary. Pursuing Justice is essential reading for everyone interested in law, justice, human rights, criminology, peacebuilding and restorative justice.

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  • Governing Girls

    Rehabilitation in the Age of Risk

    By Christie Barron     September 2011

    In recent years there has been significant media hype and moral panic over assaults and violent crimes perpetrated by young women. The governmental response to control crime and to provide protection to citizens has taken various, often contradictory, forms. The current research agenda on controlling youth violence in Canada, especially in light of provisions in the Youth Criminal Justice Act, is focused on risk assessment. The approach, however, ignores how “risk” is a socio-cultural phenomenon. Through interviews with young female offenders and youth justice authorities, Governing Girls examines female youth violence in the contemporary landscape of control and the increasing reliance on risk assessment tools to classify and manage youths’ level of risk. Exploring the meaning of treatment and rehabilitation in the age of risk, as well as analyzing the gender, race and class dimensions of the risk construct, Christie L. Barron questions the impact of risk rationality and argues that actuarial technologies depoliticize the process of control and further exclude and marginalize young female offenders.

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