Book Search

  • Topic: Canadian Politics
  • Rethinking the Politics of Labour in Canada

    Edited by Stephanie Ross and Larry Savage     March 2012

    Though the Canadian labour movement’s postwar political, economic and social achievements may have seemed like irrevocable contributions to human progress, they have proven to be anything but. Since the mid-1970s, labour’s political influence and capacity to defend, let alone extend, these gains has been seriously undermined by the strategies of both capitalist interests and the neoliberal state. Electoral de-alignment and the decline of class-based voting, bursts of unsustained extra-parliamentary militancy and a general lack of influence on state ac- tors and policy outcomes all signal that the labour movement is in crisis. Despite much experimentation in an attempt to regain political clout, labour continues to experience deep frustration and stagnation. As such, the labour movement’s future political capacities are in question, and the need for critical appraisal is urgent. Understanding how and why workers were able to exert collective power in the postwar era, how they lost it and how they might re-establish it is the central concern of Rethinking the Politics of Labour in Canada.

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  • About Canada: Disability Rights

    By Deborah Stienstra     March 2012

    Through a close examination of employment, education, transportation, telecommunications and health care, About Canada: Disability Rights explores the landscape of disability rights in Canada and finds that, while important advances have been made, Canadians with disabilities still experience significant barriers in obtaining their human rights. Using the stories and voices of people with disabilities, Deborah Stienstra argues that disability is not about “faulty” bodies that need to be fixed, but about the institutional, cultural and attitudinal reactions to certain kinds of bodies, and that neoliberal ideas of independence and individualism are at the heart of the continuing discrimination against “disabled” people. Stienstra contends that achieving disability rights is possible, but not through efforts to “fix” certain kinds of bodies. Rather it can be achieved through universal design, disability supports, social and economic supports and belonging – in short, through foundational social transformation of Canadian society.

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  • Lester Pearson’s Peacekeeping

    The Truth May Hurt

    By Yves Engler     February 2012

    Lester Pearson is one of Canada’s most important political figures. A Nobel Peace laureate, he is considered a great peacekeeper and ‘honest broker.’ But in this critical examination of his work, Pearson is exposed as an ardent cold warrior who backed colonialism and apartheid in Africa, Zionism, coups in Guatemala, Iran and Brazil and the U.S. invasion of the Dominican Republic. A beneficiary of U.S. intervention in Canadian political affairs, he also provided important support to the U.S. in Vietnam and pushed to send troops to the American war in Korea. Written in the form of a submission to an imagined “Truth and Reconciliation” commission about Canada’s foreign policy past Lester Pearson’s Peacekeeping: The Truth May Hurt challenges one of the most important Canadian foreign policy myths.

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  • Canadian Studies

    Past, Present, Praxis

    Edited by Jane Koustas and Christl Verduyn     February 2012

    Canadian Studies: Past, Present, Praxis provides an overview of the development and evolution of Canadian Studies as a field of research and teaching, from the landmark Symons Report in 1975 to current reflections on directions, relevance and challenges of the field. The collection includes key historical documents – which remain forward-looking and consequential and whose aims and challenges are reflected in present-day considerations of and commentaries on Canadian Studies – as well as new writings that examine the most important contemporary issues and practices in the field, such as its social relevance and political activism, its international dimension and its place in contemporary scholarship. Bringing together historical and current perspectives and established and new scholars, this volume offers a frank and critical assessment of the contributions of Canadian Studies, its ongoing potential and its challenges for the future.

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  • Dynamics and Trajectories

    Canada and North America

    Edited by Michael Fox and Andrew Nurse     January 2012

    Canada, the United States and Mexico are involved in a complex relationship governed by the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), but given the diversity between and within these societies, it is difficult to determine which interactions are beneficial to entire countries. Through a multidisciplinary perspective, Dynamics and Trajectories provides case studies into the diverse factors that affect political, economic, cultural and foreign policy decisions as well as the social and human dynamics of population movements after NAFTA. Collectively, the essays in this collection suggest that Canada’s evolving relationship with its North American partners cannot be interpreted through the lens of a single overarching dynamic, but rather as a range of factors that will likely affect different sections of the population in different ways. Dynamics and Trajectories also illuminates the ways in which inequalities in power in all three countries affect the process of international interchange and how this can condition a wider engagement with globalization.

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  • The Ocean Ranger

    Remaking the Promise of Oil

    By Susan Dodd     January 2012

    On February 15, 1982, the oil rig Ocean Ranger sank off the coast of Newfoundland taking the entire crew of eighty-four men – including the author’s brother – down with it. It was the worst sea disaster in Canada since the Second World War, but the memory of this event gradually faded into a sad story about a bad storm – relegated to the “Extreme Weather” section of the CBC archives. Susan Dodd resurrects this disaster from the realm of “history” and maps the socio-political processes of its aftermath, when power, money and collective hopes for the future revised the story of corporate indifference and betrayal of public trust into a “lesson learned” by an heroic industry advancing technology in the face of a brutal environment. This book is a navigational resource for other disaster aftermaths, including that of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico, and a call for vigilant government regulation of industry in all its forms.

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  • About Canada: Media

    By Peter Steven     September 2011

    Canada enjoys a long-held reputation for producing high-quality media, from National Film Board documentaries to the CBC to children’s programming. But in recent years, funding cuts, commercial media concentration and a sour political environment have been steadily eroding this reputation. In About Canada: Media, Peter Steven examines developments in film, television, the internet and newspapers and finds that the quality of our news and entertainment media is steadily declining, as well as becoming increasingly restricted and less diverse. Although Canada is not alone in this crisis of quality, we are particularly vulnerable living in the shadow of the United States. However, despite this decline and the shadow of our southern neighbour, Canada still produces distinctive and popular work, which receives critical international acclaim. About Canada: Media explores all things CanCon and argues that the Canadian people must reclaim the media from elite interests in order to ensure its democratic and quality future.

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  • About Canada: Queer Rights

    By Peter Knegt     September 2011

    Is Canada a “queer utopia”? Canada was the fourth country in the world – and the first in the Western Hemisphere – to legalize same-sex marriage. Queer people in Canada enjoy many of the same legal rights as heterosexuals, and social acceptance of homosexuality has grown exponentially. But are these the goals that queer activists hoped to achieve? Is this legal regulation and normalization of homosexuality what the lesbian and gay liberation movement of the early 1970s fought for? Using the origins of this movement as a starting point, About Canada: Queer Rights examines the history of the struggle for queer rights in Canada to create a better understanding of the present. What Peter Knegt finds is that Canada’s queer people are as diverse and multicultural as Canada itself – they are not easily generalized and have most certainly not achieved equality.

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  • Private Affluence, Public Austerity

    Economic Crisis and Democratic Malaise in Canada

    By Stephen McBride and Heather Whiteside     April 2011

    “The book is both timely and sorely needed. There is simply nothing like it. A brilliant and surprisingly clear analysis of the theory and practice of Canadian politics in the current conjuncture of capitalist development, the authors provide an exceptionally clear and most useful exposition of the forces at play, arising out of the propensity of capitalism towards crisis.”

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  • About Canada: Children & Youth

    By Bernard Schissel     March 2011

    Canada is a signatory on the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child, which guarantees the protection and care of children and youth. About Canada: Children and Youth examines each of the rights within the Canadian context – and finds Canada wanting. Schissel argues that although our expressed desire is to protect and care for our children, the reality is that young people, in Canada and around the world, often lack basic human rights. The lives of young people are steeped in abuse from the education and justice systems, exploitation by corporations, ill health and poverty. And while the hearts of Canadians go out to youth in distant countries suffering under oppressive circumstances, those same hearts often have little sympathy for the suffering of youth, particularly disadvantaged youth, within Canada. This book explores our contradictory views and argues that we must do more to ensure that the rights of the child are upheld.

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