Book Search

  • Topic: Public Policy
  • Canada’s National Child Benefit

    Phoenix or Fizzle?

    Edited by Douglas Durst     January 1999

    The National Child Benefit announced in the 1997 federal Budget promised 850 million dollars to move children out of the welfare rolls and the trap of poverty. This book attempts to outline the key concepts of this new program and set the stage for discussion of its potential impact. The writers do not agree. This book does not present a unified argument either supporting or critiquing the program but raises a series of important issues and concerns regarding the programs effectiveness in addressing child poverty. The question remains: Is this new federal social program a phoenix rising from the ashes of past social welfare programs or just a federal fizzle?

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  • Shrinking the State

    Globalization and Public Administration

    By Bryan Evans and John Shields     January 1998

    This book provides a political economy perspective on recent changes within Canadian public administrative practice and structure, revealing the theoretical and practical underpinnings of neo-liberal public administration. It also addresses itself to the search for more democratic alternatives. This work is intended to serve as a text for courses in public administration and Canadian government and politics. The role of globalization, state fiscal crisis, economic restructuring and the ideological shift to the political right are viewed as central explanatory factors in public administrative and public policy change.

  • Remaking Canadian Social Policy

    Social Security in the Late 1990’s

    Edited by Jane Pulkingham and Gordon Ternowetsky     January 1997

    This book critically examines the changing landscape of Canadian social policy that is taking place as a result of the Liberal government’s Social Security Review (SSR) and recent budgets. The objective is to provide an alternative venue to the “official” consultation process of the SSR, while at the same time providing input into the rebuilding of Canadian social programs. Major factors that led to the SSR are examined: the role of the Minister of Finance, the fiscal power and moral authority of the federal state in a decentralized nation, globalization and labour market restructuring, the concept of workfare, the impact on women, the role of “popular sector” groups and the future of the welfare state.

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  • The Politics of Community Services (second edition)

    Immigrant Women, Class and the State

    By Roxana Ng     January 1996

    “Students like it a lot. It is readable, although it offers a complex argument. It is practical and speaks to experiences that many (students) have had. It offers a model of what an empirical study using social organization of knowledge looks like.”-Marie Campbell, Social Work, University of Victoria

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  • Child and Family Policies

    Strategies, Struggles and Options

    Edited by Jane Pulkingham and Gordon Ternowetsky     December 1995

    The papers in this collection address the changing context of child and family policies which have been ushered in by the Liberal government’s Social Security Review (SSR). The contributions analyze the implications of government policy shifts showing how they are particularly devastating for children of low income, welfare, first nations and single parent families. They suggest policy options and some directions that advocacy groups might take in developing a politics of influence.

  • Names, Numbers and Northern Policy

    Inuit, Project Surname, and the Politics of Identity

    By Valerie Alia     January 1994

    Names are the cornerstones of cultures. They identify individuals, represent life, express and embody power. When power is unequal and people are colonized at one level or another, naming is manipulated form the outside. In the Canadian North, the most blatant example of this manipulation is the long history of interference by visitors with the ways to Inuit named themselves and their land. This book is a concise history of government-sponsored interference with Inuit identity.