Book Search

  • Topic: Indigenous Resistance & Decolonization
  • Aboriginal Fishing Rights

    Laws, Courts, Politics

    By Parnesh Sharma     January 1998

    This book examines the nature of aboriginal fishing rights before and after the Sparrow decision from a perspective of whether disadvantaged groups are able to use the law to advance their causes of social progress and equality. It includes interviews with the key players in the fishing industry: the Musqueam Indian Band, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the commercial industry. It concludes that aboriginal fishing rights remain subject to arbitrary control and examines why and how this has happened.

  • L’sitkuk

    The Story of the Bear River Mi’kmaw Community

    By Darlene A. Ricker     January 1997

    L’sitkuk (pronounced elsetkook) is the original name for the Bear River Mi’kmaw community, which is part of the Mi’kmaw First Nation. Nestled close to the Bear River watershed, this tiny native community is regaining its culture, language and identity after hundreds of years of colonialism and assimilation. Living in the area for thousands of years, they were among the first people in Canada to have continuous contact with non-natives.

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    A Roseway Book
  • The Mi’kmaw Concordat

    By James (Sekej) Youngblood Henderson     January 1997

    This important work, written primarily as a Native Studies text, fills a large gap in the history of Native peoples in the Americas. It is a fascinating multidisciplinary journey covering intellectual history, law, political science, religious studies, and Mi’kmaw legends, oral history and perceptions from the arrival in America by Columbus and other Europeans in the fifteenth century to the Mi’kmaw Concordat in the early seventeenth century. There is virtually nothing else in print concerning the relationship between the Mi’kmaw Nation (or any other First Nation) and the Church during the Holy Roman Empire.

  • Differing Visions

    Administering Indian Residential Schooling in Prince Albert, 1867-1995

    By Noel Dyck     January 1997

    “This book tells the story of how residential schooling for Indian children has been administered in Prince Albert for more than a century. In some ways, our experience of residential schooling has been similar to that of other Aboriginal peoples throughout Canada and other countries. In other ways, however, our story is quite different. At a time when Indian residential schools were closing elsewhere in Canada, the people of the Prince Albert Grant Council saw a need to take over and completely remake an institution that had previously been used to direct and control our people. Recognizing the positive role that a completely different kind of Indian-controlled child education centre might play, we have created and pursued our own vision of how to care for and educate those of our children who require special treatment. The courage and commitment that our leaders and staff have shown in working to make this vision a reality deserves to be celebrated. The tactics that federal officials have employed to frustrate and undermine our efforts also need to be recorded.” -Grand Chief Alphonse Bird

  • Thunder in my Soul

    A Mohawk Woman Speaks

    By Patricia Monture-Angus     January 1995

    This book contains the reflections of one Mohawk woman and her struggles to find a good place to be in Canadian society. The essays, written in enjoyable and accessible language, document the struggles against oppression that Aboriginal people face, as well as the success and change that have come to Aboriginal communities. It speaks to both the mind and the heart.

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  • Names, Numbers and Northern Policy

    Inuit, Project Surname, and the Politics of Identity

    By Valerie Alia     January 1994

    Names are the cornerstones of cultures. They identify individuals, represent life, express and embody power. When power is unequal and people are colonized at one level or another, naming is manipulated form the outside. In the Canadian North, the most blatant example of this manipulation is the long history of interference by visitors with the ways to Inuit named themselves and their land. This book is a concise history of government-sponsored interference with Inuit identity.

  • Issumatuq

    Learning from the Traditional Healing Wisdom of the Canadian Inuit

    By Kit Minor     January 1992

    Through the development of a culture-specific design the author shows us how Inuit people, in a working relationship with members of the dominant culture, can continue to define and decide on appropriate helping skills.

  • Elusive Justice

    Beyond the Marshall Inquiry

    Edited by Joy Mannette     January 1992

    “The Marshall Commission Report does not deserve accolades. While it acknowledges errors, negligence and mismanagement, it did not make the connections necessary to begin the process of developing a dialogue about a justice system that Aboriginal people can respect, or which respects Aboriginal people.” - M.E. Turpel, Dalhousie Law School

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