Book Search

  • Topic: Indigenous Resistance & Decolonization
  • Comment le Puma a fini par être appelé le Chat Fantôme / Ta’n Petalu Telui’tut Skite’kmujew

    By Michael James Isaac  Illustrated by Dozay (Arlene) Christmas     June 2014

    French and Mi’kmaw version of Michael James Isaac’s How The Ghost Came to Be Called the Ghost Cat / Ta’n Petalu Telui’tut Skite’kmujewey Mia’wj. Available exclusively from Fernwood Publishing.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Decolonizing Trauma Work

    Indigenous Stories and Strategies

    By Renee Linklater  Foreword by Lewis Mehl-Madrona     May 2014

    In Decolonizing Trauma Work, Renee Linklater explores healing and wellness in Indigenous communities on Turtle Island. Drawing on a decolonizing approach, Linklater engages ten Indigenous health care practitioners in a dialogue regarding Indigenous worldviews, notions of wellness and wholistic health, critiques of psychiatry and psychiatric diagnoses, and Indigenous approaches to helping people through trauma, depression and experiences of parallel and multiple realities.

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  • The Truth that Wampum Tells

    My Debwewin on the Algonquin Land Claims Process

    By Lynn Gehl     April 2014

    The Truth that Wampum Tells offers readers a first-ever insider analysis of the contemporary land claims and self-government process in Canada.

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  • Colonized Classrooms

    Racism, Trauma and Resistance in Post-Secondary Education

    By Sheila Cote-Meek     April 2014

    In Colonized Classrooms, Sheila Cote-Meek discusses how Aboriginal students confront narratives of colonial violence in the postsecondary classroom, while they are, at the same time, living and experiencing colonial violence on a daily basis.

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  • The Answer Is Still No

    Voices of Pipeline Resistance

    Edited by Paul Bowles and Henry Veltmeyer     March 2014

    The Answer Is Still No is an important, urgent book that compiles interviews with people who live along the route of the proposed Enbridge pipeline in Northern British Columbia. This edited collection takes the passionate words and voices of twelve citizens and activists and results in one powerful position when it comes to blind economic development at the expense of our environment and communities: The answer is still “no.”

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  • Aboriginal Knowledge for Economic Development

    By David Newhouse and Jeff Orr  Compiled by Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program     February 2014

    This book analyzes the benefits, practices and challenges of Mi’kmaw and Maliseet Language Immersion programs, illustrating how these programs provide a solid foundation of worldview, ethics, values and identities that are essential for improved academic success, and examines the Honouring Traditional Knowledge Project, a two-year project to seek Elders’ views on how to include them and traditional knowledge in all aspects of community economic research and development.

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  • Aboriginal Measures for Economic Development

    By Jeff Orr and Warren Weir  Compiled by Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program     October 2013

    This volume explores Indigenous measures of economic development in First Nations Atlantic Canadian communities that are of relevance for First Nations peoples. Many of the challenges faced by these communities and their local, regional and national leaders in advancing economic development relate to experiences of diverse and complex issues

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  • Merging Fires

    Grassroots Peacebuilding Between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Peoples

    By Rick Wallace     September 2013

    The past two decades have witnessed the emerging role of grassroots social movements and community-based peacebuilding as key sites of transformative political and cultural engagement. Merging Fires offers case studies of grassroots alliance building between non-Indigenous activists and three Indigenous communities: the Chippewa of Nawash, the Grassy Narrows First Nation and the Anishinaabe Grand Council of Treaty #3.

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  • Indians Wear Red

    Colonialism, Resistance, and Aboriginal Street Gangs

    By Elizabeth Comack, Lawrence Deane, Larry Morrissette and Jim Silver     August 2013

    “Indians Wear Red” locates Aboriginal street gangs in the context of the racialized poverty that has become entrenched in the colonized space of Winnipeg’s North End. Drawing upon extensive interviews with Aboriginal street gang members as well as with Aboriginal women and elders, the authors develop an understanding from “inside” the inner city and through the voices of Aboriginal people – especially street gang members themselves.

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  • The Poetics of Land and Identity Among British Columbia Indigenous Peoples

    By Christine J. Elsey     April 2013

    The Poetics of Land and Identity is about the meaning of land for the many diverse First Nations within British Columbia. The work offers a study of the folklore and symbolic traditions within many Aboriginal regions and illustrates how these traditions emphasize the importance of orality and poetics as the defining factor in the value of land. Christine J. Elsey offers a deft, scholarly discussion of these “storyscapes,” providing us with a point of access for understanding First Nations’ perspectives on the world and their land. She provides an important alternative to the monetary, exploitative, resource-driven view of nature and land ownership and highlights the conflicts between the colonial, Western perspective of nature and the holistic view of First Nations people.

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