Community Development

  • Finding Their Way Again

    The Experiences of Gang-Affected Refugee Youth

    By Matthew Fast     July 2017

    When positive support mechanisms are insufficient and if basic human needs are not met, young refugees are at risk for involvement in criminal and gang activity.

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  • Solving Poverty

    Innovative Strategies from Winnipeg’s Inner City

    By Jim Silver     April 2016

    In Solving Poverty, Jim Silver, a veteran scholar actively engaged in anti-poverty efforts in Winnipeg’s inner city for decades, offers an on-the-ground analysis of this form of poverty. Silver focuses particularly on the urban Aboriginal experience, and describes a variety of creative and effective urban Aboriginal community development initiatives, as well as other anti-poverty initiatives that have been successful in Winnipeg’s inner city. In the concluding chapter Silver offers a comprehensive, pan-Canadian strategy to dramatically reduce the incidence of urban poverty in Canada.

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  • Poor Housing

    A Silent Crisis

    Edited by Josh Brandon and Jim Silver     October 2015

    Across Canada, there is a severe shortage of decent quality housing that is affordable to those with low incomes, and much of the housing that is available is inadequate, even appalling. The poor condition of housing for those below the poverty line adds to the weight of the complex poverty they already endure, which includes worsening health, adversely affected education and neighbourhoods that are more prone to crime and violence.

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  • Co-operatives in a Post-growth Era

    Creating Co-operative Economics

    Edited by Sonja Novkovic and Tom Webb     September 2014

    Featuring a remarkable roster of internationally renowned critical thinkers, this book presents a feasible alternative for a more environmentally sustainable and equitable economic system. The time has never been better for cooperatives everywhere to recognize their own potential and ability to change the economic landscape.

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  • The Last Stand

    Schools, Communities and the Future of Rural Nova Scotia

    By Paul W. Bennett     September 2013

    The hour is late and the clock is ticking for rural and small town communities in Nova Scotia. School closures capture the news headlines, but they signal a more profound development: the gradual, yet relentless, decline in rural populations and a demographic shift that threatens to extinguish what remains of rural communities in Nova Scotia.

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  • Inner City Renovation

    How a Social Enterprise Changes Lives and Communities

    By Marty Donkervoort  Foreword by Jack Quarter     August 2013

    Inner City Renovation (ICR) is a much-heralded social enterprise in Winnipeg’s North End which has become an example of the potential for social enterprises to support people living on society’s margins and engage them in a productive livelihood.

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  • Making the City

    Women Who Made a Difference

    By Working Women Community Centre     June 2012

    This book tracks some of the important contributions of immigrant women in Toronto, their participation in grass roots organizing and community development. It connects grassroots work to larger social movements in Canada and the world. The story is told primarily through oral histories-the women telling their own stories-and weaving those stories into the larger multicoloured and richly textured fabrick of Toronto’s social history

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  • Community Organizing

    A Holistic Approach

    By Joan Kuyek     August 2011

    “History is full of stories of the oppressed rebelling against the oppressor, only to reinstate an equally oppressive system. What we learn from oppression is how to oppress. If we want a truly transformative politics, then we must take up methods that embody the kind of world we want to create; we have to change deeply embedded beliefs and behaviours.”

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  • Vanishing Schools, Threatened Communities

    The Contested Schoolhouse in Maritime Canada 1850–2010

    By Paul W. Bennett     April 2011

    Traditional schoolhouses and neighbourhood schools are disappearing at an alarming rate, making way for “big box” schools that serve multiple communities and adhere to the logic of modernization, centralization and uniformity. In Vanishing Schools, Threatened Communities, author Paul W. Bennett explores the phenomenon of school closures, focusing on Maritime Canada from 1850 until the present day. Here is a lively, stimulating book that examines the rise of common schooling from one-room schoolhouses that encouraged local democratic control through to the rise of “super-sized” schools governed by a vast bureaucracy that silences public participation. Though the public has not always remained silent, local “save our schools” movements have not succeeded in halting the march of “progress.” Bennett sets out, in this colourful history of schools, to remind us of the principles that formed the basis of the public education system and urges us to return to these principles in order to better serve the needs of our children and our communities.

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  • Good Places to Live

    Poverty and Public Housing in Canada

    By Jim Silver     February 2011

    Public housing projects are stigmatized and stereotyped as bad places to live, as havens of poverty, illegal activity and violence. In many cities they are being bulldozed, ostensibly for these reasons but also because the land on which they are located has become so valuable. In Good Places to Live, Jim Silver argues that the problems with which it is so often associated are not inherent to public housing but are the result of structural inequalities and neoliberal government policies. This book urges readers to reconsider the fate of public housing, arguing that urban poverty – what Silver calls spatially concentrated racialized poverty – is not solved by razing public housing. On the contrary, public housing projects rebuilt from within, based on communities’ strengths and supported by meaningful public investment could create vibrant and healthy neighbourhoods while maintaining much-needed low-income housing. Considering four public housing projects, in Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax and Winnipeg, Silver contends that public housing projects can be good places to live – if the political will exists.

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