African Heritage

  • Canada in Africa

    300 Years of Aid and Exploitation

    By Yves Engler     September 2015

    Based on an exhaustive look at the public record as well as on-the-ground research, Canada in Africa shows how the federal government pressed African countries to follow neoliberal economic prescriptions and sheds light on Canada’s part in the violence that has engulfed Somalia, Rwanda and the Congo, as well as how Canada’s indifference to climate change means a death sentence to ever-growing numbers of Africans.

  • Live from the Afrikan Resistance!

    By El Jones     September 2014

    Live from the Afrikan Resistance! is the first collection of spoken word poetry by Halifax’s fifth Poet Laureate, El Jones. These poems speak of community and struggle. They are grounded in the political culture of African Nova Scotia and inherit the styles and substances of hip-hop, dub and calypso’s political commentary. Gathered from seven years of performances, these poems represent the tradition of the prophetic voice in Black Nova Scotia.

    A Roseway Book
  • Visitor

    My Life in Canada

    By Anthony Stewart     August 2014

    Is there a future time when newcomers and visible minorities will be enabled to feel like they belong in Canada? Or will they have to accept their experience as visitors to Canada no matter how long they have lived here? These are some of the questions Anthony Stewart tackles eloquently and with considerable wit.

  • If This Is Freedom

    By Gloria Ann Wesley     September 2013

    If This Is Freedom continues the story of struggle for Loyalist settlers in Nova Scotia after the American Revolutionary War.

    A Roseway Book
  • Jamaica in the Canadian Experience

    A Multiculturalizing Presence

    Edited by Andrea Davis and Carl E. James     August 2012

    In 2012, Jamaica celebrates its fiftieth anniversary of independence from Britain. In the short period of its life as a nation, Jamaica’s increasingly powerful influence on global culture cannot go unremarked. The growth of Jamaican diasporas beyond Britain to the United States, Canada and West Africa has served to strengthen Jamaica’s global reach, so that today Jamaica’s cultural, economic and political achievements are felt way beyond its national borders. This anthology commemorates Jamaica’s independence by acknowledging the immense and widespread contributions of Jamaica and Jamaicans to Canadian society.

  • Theorizing Africentricity in Action: Who We Are Is What We See

    Edited by Delvina E.  Bernard and Susan M.  Brigham     May 2012

    Education is a primary site of social change for people of African descent in Nova Scotia, which is why centuries of systemic neglect and racial inequities in the public school system have failed to suppress the creativity, resilience and resourcefulness of African Nova Scotian learners and their desire to succeed. This collection of articles by African Nova Scotian educators brings together new and enlightening research and analyses that go beyond education alone. Each chapter offers personal critical reflections and theory-building in Africentricity and lifelong learning. The perspectives of these authors present important challenges to novice and experienced educators as well as to laypersons. The book highlights such topics as honouring the knowledge of our elders, the role of parental involvement in Black students’ academic achievement, racial identity development, Africentric schooling, Canadian Black feminism and African spirituality. Theorizing Africentricity in Action: Who We Are Is What We See reveals the innate ability of Black people to re-invent themselves in the face of oppressive conditions and still remain intact as Africans – culturally, spiritually and psychologically.

  • Chasing Freedom

    By Gloria Ann Wesley     August 2011

    Young Adult Historical Fiction

    A Roseway Book
  • Brown Skin, White Masks

    By Hamid Dabashi     March 2011

    Brown Skin, White Masks provides a critical examination of the role that immigrant “comprador intellectuals” play in facilitating the global domination of American imperialism. In Black Skin, White Masks, Frantz Fanon explored the consequences of inferiority that colonized people felt, leading them to identify with the ideology of the colonial agency. Dabashi picks up where Fanon left off and extends Fanon’s insights as they apply to today’s world. Dabashi examines the ideology of cultural superiority and provides a passionate account of how these immigrant intellectuals continue to betray any notion of home or country in order to manufacture consent for imperial projects.

  • Black Canadians Second Edition

    History, Experience, Social Conditions, Revised Edition

    By Joseph Mensah     February 2010

    Black Canadians provides an authoritative reference for teachers, students and the general public who seek to know more about the Black Diaspora in North America. Arguments made in this book may be unpleasant for those with little appetite for pointed, provocative views and analysis from the standpoint of Black people. For those with a genuine interest in venturing beyond established orthodoxies and simplistic solutions to the contentious ethno-racial problems in Canada, this book will be insightful and worthy of close attention. This new edition expands the regional coverage of Black history, updates all the statistics with the 2006 census data, and adds important new material on multiculturalism and employment equity.

  • African Nova Scotian – Mi’kmaw Relations

    By Paula C. Madden     September 2009

    The Indigenous people of Nova Scotia, the Mi’kmaq, have been dispossessed of their lands and, since the early 1820s, confined to reserves. African Nova Scotians have also been dispossessed of lands originally granted to them by white colonial governments and settled in communities with names like Africville, Preston or Birchtown. Yet “the story of Africville, and other stories of dispossession,” argues author Paula C. Madden, “cannot be told and understood outside the context of the dispossession of Indigenous peoples. To do so would be to erase and cover over Mi’kmaw stories and their very existence within the territory/nation.” Madden concludes that “Mi’kmaw people resisted the dire conditions of their lives and their demands for justice were generally ignored. The (provincial) state’s insistence on pinning their fortunes to that of African Nova Scotians by forced collaborations such as the Transitional Year Program and the Indigenous Black and Mi’kmaq program did not serve them well in creating programs specific to the needs and desires of their community. It also created a situation in which African Nova Scotians failed to appreciate the meaning of their relationship with the Crown, thereby causing resentment and at times anger between the two communities.”