Books

  • Invisible Giant

    Cargill and Its Transnational Strategies

    By Brewster Kneen     January 1995

    Transnational corporations(TNCs) straddle the globe, largely unseen by the public. Cargill is the epitome of transnational corporation - the largest private corporation in North America, and possibly in the world, it trades in all agricultural commodities and produces and processes a great many of them.

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  • More Perishable than Lettuce or Tomatoes

    Labour Law Reform and Toronto’s Newspapers

    By Edward T. Silva     January 1995

    This book presents an in-depth analysis of the “unbalanced” treatment by the four largest Toronto dailies of the Ontario NDP’s 1992 proposed labour reform law.

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  • Politics on the Margins

    Restructuring and the Canadian Women’s Movement

    By Janine Brodie     January 1995

    “Janine Brodie’s thoughtful and insightful analysis of the impact of international restructuring on the women’s movement asks all the right questions. Her challenge to develop new strategies in the face of the destruction of the welfare state should be taken up by feminists everywhere.” - Judy Rebick

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  • Something’s Wrong Somewhere

    Globalization, Community and the Moral Economy of the Farm Crisis

    By Christopher Lind     January 1995

    “Recalling the fascinating history of rural protests in seventeenth to nineteenth century England, (Lind) argues that today’s crisis has as much to do with morals and ethics as with economics.”-Kim Cariou, People’s Voice

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  • Strategies for the Year 2000

    A Women’s Handbook

    By Barbara Roberts and Deborah Stienstra     January 1995

    How well has Canada measured up to its obligations under the two agreements it signed during the UN Decade of Women? The authors of this book detail the terms of the conventions (the Convention for the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the Forward Looking Strategies for the Advancement of Women by the Year 2000) and have painstakingly chronicled the progress the provincial, territorial, and federal governments have made towards fulfilling their legal obligations in areas such as women’s participation in decision-making, childcare, violence against women and so on. All levels of governments are found wanting. As an assessment of progress on women’s equality in Canada, it is fascinating reading and a thorough resource.

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  • The Socialist Register 1995

    Why Not Capitalism?

    Edited by Leo Panitch     January 1995

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  • Thunder in my Soul

    A Mohawk Woman Speaks

    By Patricia Monture-Angus     January 1995

    This book contains the reflections of one Mohawk woman and her struggles to find a good place to be in Canadian society. The essays, written in enjoyable and accessible language, document the struggles against oppression that Aboriginal people face, as well as the success and change that have come to Aboriginal communities. It speaks to both the mind and the heart.

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  • Undressing the Canadian State

    The Politics of Pornography from Hicklin to Butler

    By Kirsten K. Johnson     January 1995

    Through a detailed historical analysis of Canada’s obscenity legislation, Johnson argues that the state implicitly supports the ideology of pornography.

  • Maid in the Market

    Women’s Paid Domestic Labour

    Edited by Sedef Arat-Koç and Wenona Giles     January 1994

    Even when done in “public” and for pay, the work of housekeeping and caregiving in capitalist society is problematic. This book shows how the work of reproduction is subordinated and devalued in the marketplace as well as at home.

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  • Names, Numbers and Northern Policy

    Inuit, Project Surname, and the Politics of Identity

    By Valerie Alia     January 1994

    Names are the cornerstones of cultures. They identify individuals, represent life, express and embody power. When power is unequal and people are colonized at one level or another, naming is manipulated form the outside. In the Canadian North, the most blatant example of this manipulation is the long history of interference by visitors with the ways to Inuit named themselves and their land. This book is a concise history of government-sponsored interference with Inuit identity.