Books

  • Growing Up Salty and Other Plays

    By Natalie Meisner     January 1997

    The questions raised in Natalie Meisner’s plays will follow you out the door. At their root is the ghost that haunts the modern theatre: What is the role of live theatre in the information age? Why is it necessary? What do we get from the experience that cannot be had in any other artistic medium?

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    A Roseway Book
  • Japan at Century’s End

    Changes, Challenges and Choices

    Edited by Hugh Millward and James H. Morrison     January 1997

    A timely compilation of 21 essays on the wide range of issues confronting Japan in the late 1990s. The authors provide a mainly Canadian perspective on domestic and international politics, the economy, business, technology, social issues, the environment, and more. The six major sections are introduced by the editors, and a comprehensive index allows cross-referencing of all topics.

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  • L’sitkuk

    The Story of the Bear River Mi’kmaw Community

    By Darlene A. Ricker     January 1997

    L’sitkuk (pronounced elsetkook) is the original name for the Bear River Mi’kmaw community, which is part of the Mi’kmaw First Nation. Nestled close to the Bear River watershed, this tiny native community is regaining its culture, language and identity after hundreds of years of colonialism and assimilation. Living in the area for thousands of years, they were among the first people in Canada to have continuous contact with non-natives.

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    A Roseway Book
  • Open for Business/Closed to People

    Mike Harris’s Ontario

    Edited by Diana Ralph, Andre Regimbald and Neree St-Amand     January 1997

    For anyone concerned about Mike Harris’s neo-conservative “Common Sense Revolution,” this book is a must. It chronicles Harris’s first year as premier and the emerging resistance movement. Part 1 puts the Harris “revolution” in context, exposing its underlying transnational corporate agenda and the previous right-wing U.S. and British governments on which it draws. It demonstrates how the smoke screen of populism and fiscal responsibility hides a fundamental attack on concepts of democracy and social citizenship. Part 2 spells out the profound toll which Harris’s policies are taking on the people of Ontario, especially on its most vulnerable members: low-income people, women, children, workers, and ethno-cultural and francophone communities. Part 3 describes a broad range of strategies to survive and win against this neo-conservative assault.

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  • Remaking Canadian Social Policy

    Social Security in the Late 1990’s

    Edited by Jane Pulkingham and Gordon Ternowetsky     January 1997

    This book critically examines the changing landscape of Canadian social policy that is taking place as a result of the Liberal government’s Social Security Review (SSR) and recent budgets. The objective is to provide an alternative venue to the “official” consultation process of the SSR, while at the same time providing input into the rebuilding of Canadian social programs. Major factors that led to the SSR are examined: the role of the Minister of Finance, the fiscal power and moral authority of the federal state in a decentralized nation, globalization and labour market restructuring, the concept of workfare, the impact on women, the role of “popular sector” groups and the future of the welfare state.

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  • Society, State and Market

    A Guide to Competing Theories of Development

    Edited by John Martinussen     January 1997

    This major new textbook has been specifically written for students of development studies. It provides a comprehensive and multi-disciplinary picture of development research over the past generation, and is organized around four major themes: economic development and underdevelopment, politics and the state, socio-economic development and the state and civil society and the development process. It is the only textbook in this field to present the full range of theoretical approaches and current debates.

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  • Tech High

    Globalization and the Future of Canadian Education

    Edited by Marita Moll     January 1997

    This collaboration of critical essays on the computerization of Canada’s schools examines the current technological revolution in the broader perspective of globalization and the neo-liberal agenda. The authors question the assumptions that technologically-enhanced education will save money, help students and teachers, and create a generation of well-paid knowledge workers. Computers may inform, but only teachers can help students analyze and interpret this information. The authors call for a slowdown in the rapid introduction of information technology, so that its dangers as well as potential advantages can be adequately discussed.

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  • The Mi’kmaw Concordat

    By James (Sekej) Youngblood Henderson     January 1997

    This important work, written primarily as a Native Studies text, fills a large gap in the history of Native peoples in the Americas. It is a fascinating multidisciplinary journey covering intellectual history, law, political science, religious studies, and Mi’kmaw legends, oral history and perceptions from the arrival in America by Columbus and other Europeans in the fifteenth century to the Mi’kmaw Concordat in the early seventeenth century. There is virtually nothing else in print concerning the relationship between the Mi’kmaw Nation (or any other First Nation) and the Church during the Holy Roman Empire.

  • The Post-Development Reader

    Edited by Victoria Bawtree and Majid Rahnema     January 1997

    Most scholars and practitioners are now agreed that the world is on the threshold of a completely new era in the history of development. This reader brings together in a powerfully diverse, but ultimately coherent, statement some of the very best thinking on the subject by scholars and activists around the world. The contributors provide a devastating critique of what the mainstream paradigm has in practice done to the peoples of the world, and to their richly diverse and sustainable ways of living. They also present some essential ideas to construct new, humane, and culturally and ecologically respectful modes of development.

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  • The Socialist Register 1997

    Ruthless Criticism of All that Exists

    Edited by Leo Panitch     January 1997

    “Constructing the future and settling everything for all times are not our affair, it is all the more clear what we have to accomplish at present: I am referring to ruthless criticism of all that exists, ruthless both in the sense of not being afraid of the results it arrives at and in the sense of being just a little afraid of conflict with the powers that be.” -Marx, 1843

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