Aboriginal Knowledge for Economic Development

By David Newhouse and Jeff Orr  Compiled by Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program  

Paperback $24.95

This book analyzes the benefits, practices and challenges of Mi’kmaw and Maliseet Language Immersion programs, illustrating how these programs provide a solid foundation of worldview, ethics, values and identities that are essential for improved academic success, and examines the Honouring Traditional Knowledge Project, a two-year project to seek Elders’ views on how to include them and traditional knowledge in all aspects of community economic research and development.

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Contents

  • Foreword (Marie Battiste)
  • Introduction: How to Live on the Back of a Turtle (David Newhouse)
  • Part I: Best Practices and Challenges in Mi’kmaq and Maliseet Language Immersion Programs
  • Successes and Challenges in Mi’kmaw and Wolastoqi Latuwewakon
  • Language Immersion Programs (Joanne Tompkins & Anne Murray-Orr)
  • An Inquiry into an Established Indigenous Language Immersion Program: A Case Study of a Mi’kmaw Immersion Program (Sherise Paul-Gould, Starr Sock, Anne Murray-Orr & Joanne Tompkins)
  • Beginning an Indigenous Language Immersion Program: A Case Study of a Wolastoqi Latuwewakon Immersion Program (Roseanne Clark, Darcy Pirie, Joanne Tompkins & Anne Murray-Orr)
  • Implications of Aboriginal Immersion for Economic Development, Life-Long Learning and Community Wellbeing (Anne Murray- Orr & Joanne Tompkins)
  • Part II: APCFNC Elders Project: Honouring Traditional Knowledge
  • Introduction to the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Elders Project: Honouring Traditional Knowledge (2009-2011) (Sharon Taylor, Gillian Austin, John R. Sylliboy & Heather Castleden)
  • Elders Mawio’mi in Millbrook First Nation, Day One Proceedings
  • Elders Mawio’mi in Millbrook First Nation, Day Two Proceedings
  • Elder Recommendations: A Framework for Traditional Knowledge and Education and Research
  • Conclusion: Identity, Fluency, Academic Success and Aboriginal Economic Development in the 21st Century (David Newhouse)
  • References

Authors

  • Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program

    The Atlantic Aboriginal Economic Development Integrated Research Program (AAEDIRP) is a partnership between the member communities of the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat (APCFNC), the Innu and Inuit of Labrador, twelve Atlantic Canadian universities and federal and provincial government funders. The main purpose of the AAEDIRP is to improve the knowledge base concerning Atlantic Aboriginal economic development in order to improve the lives of Aboriginal peoples in the region.