Wayne Antony

Wayne Antony is a publisher at Fernwood Publishing. He is also a founding member of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Manitoba (CCPA-MB) and has been on the board of directors since its inception in 1997. Prior to becoming involved with the CCPA-MB, he worked with the Winnipeg political activist organizations, The Socialist Education Centre and Thin Ice. Wayne also taught sociology at the University of Winnipeg for eighteen years. He is co-author of three reports on the state of public services in Manitoba (for CCAP-MB) and is co-editor (with Les Samuelson) of five editions of Power and Resistance: Critical Thinking about Canadian Social Issues, co-editor (with Dave Broad) of Citizens or Consumers? Social Policy in a Market Society and Capitalism Rebooted? Work and Welfare in the New Economy (both with Dave Broad), and co-editor (with Julie Guard) Bankruptcies and Bailouts.

  • Power and Resistance

    Critical Thinking about Canadian Social Issues, Sixth Edition

    Edited by Wayne Antony, Jessica Antony and Les Samuelson     Forthcoming April 2017

    “The perfect teaching tool to introduce students to some of the pressing challenges facing contemporary Canada and the world.”

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  • Power and Resistance, 5th ed.

    Critical Thinking about Canadian Social Issues

    Edited by Wayne Antony and Les Samuelson     March 2012

    How do we make sense of the social problems such as poverty, economic collapse, violence, homophobia and pollution that continue to plague Canadian society? From the neoliberal perspective all of these issues come down to individual choice and action, but from the critical perspective social issues emerge from inequalities – disparities in access to housing, education, healthcare and wealth, for example – and inequalities emerge from relations of power. Some groups of people have privileged access to resources and use their power to maintain and enhance their privilege, thereby creating problems for other groups of people. In Power and Resistance contributors use a variety of analytical approaches within this critical perspective to explore specific social, economic and political issues that result from social inequality. The essays in this collection also examine the ways that Canadians, both individually and collectively, resist these inequalities in order to resolve social troubles and create a more just society.

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  • Bankruptcies and Bailouts

    Edited by Wayne Antony and Julie Guard     May 2009

    Recession? Depression? Market adjustment? Billion-dollar bailouts? Just what is happening to the economy? Like the rest of the industrialized world, Canada is in the midst of an economic crisis that is cleary of global proportions. Yet, Nobel Prize winning economists failed to see it coming. This is unsurprising since, in the words of the newly humble Alan Greenspan, the crisis revealed “a flaw in the model … that defines the way the world works.” Bankruptcies and Bailouts explains the roots of this economic disaster. The essays in this book show, in clear and accessible language, that the global capitalist economy, dependent on hyper-extended credit, fuelled by systematic deregulation and rooted in the contradictions of a mad drive for unlimited profits, must inevitably end up in this predicament. The authors also demonstrate that there are ways out of this economic mess that do not involve simply bailing out the obscenely over-paid executives whose decisions led us to this chaos.

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  • Power and Resistance 4th ed.

    Critical Thinking about Canadian Social Issues (4th edition)

    Edited by Wayne Antony and Les Samuelson     January 2007

    How do we make sense of poverty, globalization, violence between men and women, youth politics, barriers to Aboriginal economic development, privatization of universities, and the like? These are just some of the questions taken up in Power and Resistance. The contributors to this book use a variety of analytical approaches. Yet, each shares a conviction that the social, economic and political issues confronting Canadians are shaped by the social inequalities that continue to plague us. At the same time, each author shows that, collectively and individually, Canadians resist these on-going inequalities in order to resolve our social troubles and create a more just society. This 4th edition adds chapters on youth politics, higher education, technology and work, and immigration.

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  • Capitalism Rebooted?

    Work, Welfare, and the New Economy

    Edited by Wayne Antony and Dave Broad     January 2006

    The so-called New Economy, based on huge advances in information and communication technologies, economic globalization and neoliberalism, promised to expand economic opportunities and growth, provide stimulating and well-paid jobs, reduce inequalities and develop the Third World. But the experiences of the past two decades have hardly been positive for workers and their families. While there have been significant economic and workplace changes, these changes have not been the boon to working people that was predicted. In fact, as the authors of this book show, there is significant unemployment and underemployment, including for knowledge workers. Management strategies continue to be authoritarian, and work presents new dangers to our health. Meanwhile, social services have been ripped apart. “New Economy” is simply the name being given to current attempts to reboot a very old and exploitative economic system. However, there are signs a truly new economy is possible, as trade unions, working people and progressive social movements continue the struggle for social justice.

  • Citizens or Consumers?

    Social Policy in a Market Society

    Edited by Wayne Antony and Dave Broad     January 1999

    Social policy is about citizens choosing the kind of society they want to live in. The mid-20th Century Keynesian welfare state can be seen as a citizenship package which included acceptance of intervention by the state to maintain economic growth and social stability, that meant the inclusion of many previously excluded groups in the social policy process and the institutionalization of a collective responsibility for individual welfare. But, with the ascendancy of neo-liberalism, the politics of citizenship is being replaced by a notion of citizens as consumers, whose medium of social interaction and source of economic and social security is the capitalist market.

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