Various

  • Remaking Canadian Social Policy

    Social Security in the Late 1990’s

    Edited by Jane Pulkingham and Gordon Ternowetsky     January 1997

    This book critically examines the changing landscape of Canadian social policy that is taking place as a result of the Liberal government’s Social Security Review (SSR) and recent budgets. The objective is to provide an alternative venue to the “official” consultation process of the SSR, while at the same time providing input into the rebuilding of Canadian social programs. Major factors that led to the SSR are examined: the role of the Minister of Finance, the fiscal power and moral authority of the federal state in a decentralized nation, globalization and labour market restructuring, the concept of workfare, the impact on women, the role of “popular sector” groups and the future of the welfare state.

    Learn More
  • Open for Business/Closed to People

    Mike Harris’s Ontario

    Edited by Diana Ralph, Andre Regimbald and Neree St-Amand     January 1997

    For anyone concerned about Mike Harris’s neo-conservative “Common Sense Revolution,” this book is a must. It chronicles Harris’s first year as premier and the emerging resistance movement. Part 1 puts the Harris “revolution” in context, exposing its underlying transnational corporate agenda and the previous right-wing U.S. and British governments on which it draws. It demonstrates how the smoke screen of populism and fiscal responsibility hides a fundamental attack on concepts of democracy and social citizenship. Part 2 spells out the profound toll which Harris’s policies are taking on the people of Ontario, especially on its most vulnerable members: low-income people, women, children, workers, and ethno-cultural and francophone communities. Part 3 describes a broad range of strategies to survive and win against this neo-conservative assault.

    Learn More
  • Crimes, Laws and Communities

    By John McMullan, David C. Perrier, Stephen Smith and Peter D. Swan     January 1997

    In this book, McMullan and his colleagues have provided much needed information and analysis on “unconventional” crimes by researching fire for profit, illegal fishing and business crime in Atlantic Canada. The three essays fill an information gap left by scant media reports, conflicting government statistics and, in the case of crimes of capital, wilfully concealed information.

    Learn More
  • Japan at Century’s End

    Changes, Challenges and Choices

    Edited by Hugh Millward and James H. Morrison     January 1997

    A timely compilation of 21 essays on the wide range of issues confronting Japan in the late 1990s. The authors provide a mainly Canadian perspective on domestic and international politics, the economy, business, technology, social issues, the environment, and more. The six major sections are introduced by the editors, and a comprehensive index allows cross-referencing of all topics.

    Learn More
  • Feminism and Families

    Critical Policies and Changing Practices

    Edited by Meg Luxton     January 1997

    The absence of a specific “family politics” has ceded an important political space to anti-feminist movements and weakened the capacity of the feminist movement to intervene effectively in the debates and struggles of the current period. Despite significant changes in family, domestic and interpersonal relations, the prevailing ideology of the heterosexual nuclear family as the norm still shapes social, economic and legal practices. This book argues for feminist debates in all areas affecting families and begins with such important areas as demographics, family law, lesbian parenting, women’s friendships, child benefit legislation, the contradictions of parenting, etc.

    Learn More
  • Differing Visions

    Administering Indian Residential Schooling in Prince Albert, 1867-1995

    By Noel Dyck     January 1997

    “This book tells the story of how residential schooling for Indian children has been administered in Prince Albert for more than a century. In some ways, our experience of residential schooling has been similar to that of other Aboriginal peoples throughout Canada and other countries. In other ways, however, our story is quite different. At a time when Indian residential schools were closing elsewhere in Canada, the people of the Prince Albert Grant Council saw a need to take over and completely remake an institution that had previously been used to direct and control our people. Recognizing the positive role that a completely different kind of Indian-controlled child education centre might play, we have created and pursued our own vision of how to care for and educate those of our children who require special treatment. The courage and commitment that our leaders and staff have shown in working to make this vision a reality deserves to be celebrated. The tactics that federal officials have employed to frustrate and undermine our efforts also need to be recorded.” -Grand Chief Alphonse Bird

  • Reinventing Political Science

    A Feminist Approach

    By Jill Vickers     December 1996

    This book provides an alternate version of political science for students who want to make space for themselves and for the political activities they want to study. Vickers presents a framework which builds bridges between political science and feminism, allowing for a women-centred analysis of both formal and informal politics. It incorporates radical redefinitions of politics which can open up space to study identity politics, oppression, exploitation and the struggles against sexism, racism, ablism and homophobia, as well as women’s attempts to influence state decision-making by conventional means. A survival guide for women and other students trying to reinvent political science on their own.

  • Immigration and the Legalization of Racism

    By Lisa Jakubowski     December 1996

    “The chameleon-like nature of the law-the duplicitous ways in which the law is written, the equivocal way in which it is stated and, therefore, talked about, the hiding of the truth about the resources which are expended in its implementation, the misleading way in which it casts the discretions it purports to take away and to give-its ideological functioning and its capacity to legitimate the illegitimate, all are put under the microscope in this study. It is a timely piece of work. It may make some readers uncomfortable, but it will leave no one untouched.” -H.J. Glasbeek, Professor Emeritus, Osgoode Hall Law School

  • Dismantling A Nation (Second Edition)

    The Transition to Corporate Rule in Canada (second edition)

    By Stephen McBride and John Shields     December 1996

    This new edition is reorganized to make it a more usable text and updated to include the Liberal government’s pursuit of neo-liberal policies. William K. Carroll, Sociology, University of Victoria, said of the first edition: “All the aspects of the neo-conservative policy matrix-privatization, deregulation, NAFTA, the obsession with deficits, attacks on collective bargaining, the cutbacks to social programs, the weakening of federal powers-are carefully analyzed as elements of a political project that will have disastrous consequences for most Canadians and for Canada as a nation. This book is truly essential reading for those who care about Canada’s future.”

  • In the Open

    Women Survivors of Abuse Tell Their Stories

    Edited by Kathleen Tudor     January 1996

    “Like all the women who took part in this book, I have a message for you. Please remember that no matter how desperate and hopeless your situation may get, there is a way out. I found my way out and for the first time in nine years I feel free!

    Learn More
    A Roseway Book