Various

  • The Illusion of Inclusion

    Women In Post Secondary Education

    By Jackie Stalker     January 1998

    Women have had limited access to some higher education in Canada for over a century, but their participation has never been equal to that of men. Both as students and as faculty, women continue to be discriminated against on Canadian campuses in ways ranging from the most systemic and institutional to the most interpersonal and subjective. Contributors to this anthology explore and explain various dimensions of the “illusion of inclusion,” the contradiction between the widespread belief that women and men share equal educational opportunities and the uncomfortable reality of women’s marginalization and minority status.

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  • The David Levine Affair

    Separatist Betrayal or McCarthyism North?

    By Randal Marlin     January 1998

    When the novice Board of Trustees of the newly-amalgamated Ottawa Hospital appointed David Levine as the new CEO at a salary of $330,000, it expected some controversy, but nothing like the huge outcry that followed. From the initial healine in the Ottawa Citizen on May 1, 1998, “PQ Envoy to Head Hospital,” to the lynch-mob mentality at a public meeting on May 19th, to picketing and calls for boycotts of the Board members’ businesses, Levine became a scapegoat for many problems, resentments, and frustrations felt by the Ottawa-area population. Sections of the media did little to allay these fears and resentments, and at times strongly incited them. Randall Marlin’s fascinating analysis of the David Levine affair shows not just what happened, but also the far worse things that might have happened. It signals the fragility of Canada as long as basic ideas of fairness, tolerance, and respect for truth are given second place to flag-waving nationalism, sensationalism, and rumour.

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  • The Communist Manifesto

    By Friedrich Engels and Karl Marx     January 1998

    An English translation by Samuel Moore of the original maifesto of the Communist Party, published in London in 1848.

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  • Shrinking the State

    Globalization and Public Administration

    By Bryan Evans and John Shields     January 1998

    This book provides a political economy perspective on recent changes within Canadian public administrative practice and structure, revealing the theoretical and practical underpinnings of neo-liberal public administration. It also addresses itself to the search for more democratic alternatives. This work is intended to serve as a text for courses in public administration and Canadian government and politics. The role of globalization, state fiscal crisis, economic restructuring and the ideological shift to the political right are viewed as central explanatory factors in public administrative and public policy change.

  • Circleworks

    Transforming Eurocentric Consciousness

    By Fyre Jean Graveline     January 1998

    This book is intended to contribute to both the theoretical debate and classroom practice in the field of education. It explores the legitimacy of Aboriginal, holistic paradigms within some of the diverse frameworks available to educators: experiential learning, feminist and anti-racist pedagogies are emphasized. It documents an effort to interrupt current Aboriginal/European power relations by evolving an alternative Aboriginal teaching model and enacting it within university classrooms. This work reflects an understanding that all sites must be engaged as potentially emancipatory.

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  • Beyond Two Solitudes

    By Donald Smith     January 1998

    Beyond Two Solitudes offers a fresh approach in the present constitutional and political debate based on mutual respect and a desire to live together in harmony. The French edition has been hailed as a “lively and passionate account” (Voir) and as an “explosive book, a vibrant plea for a renewed country” (Radio-Canada) Donald Smith speaks from within, as an English Canadian who has learned French, moved to Quebec and successfully integrated into Francophone society. Beyond Two Solitudes answers the anti-Quebec rhetoric of Diane Francis, Barbara Amiel, William Johnson and others. Smith interviews other English Canadians who have chosen French as their language of creation: singer and songwriter Jim Corcoran, novelist Nancy Huston, horticulturist Larry Hodgson, and American-born singer Nanette Workman, who has made her career in Quebec and France. He also interviews novelist Neil Bissoondath, now a Quebec City resident, who gives a compelling account of what French Quebec and so-called multiculturalism are really about.

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  • Aboriginal Fishing Rights

    Laws, Courts, Politics

    By Parnesh Sharma     January 1998

    This book examines the nature of aboriginal fishing rights before and after the Sparrow decision from a perspective of whether disadvantaged groups are able to use the law to advance their causes of social progress and equality. It includes interviews with the key players in the fishing industry: the Musqueam Indian Band, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the commercial industry. It concludes that aboriginal fishing rights remain subject to arbitrary control and examines why and how this has happened.

  • Yesterday’s News

    Why Canada’s Daily Newspapers are Failing Us

    By John Miller     January 1998

    Yesterday’s News is about how Canada’s daily newspapers are failing us and how we need to win them back. The book documents the takeover of Canadian daily newspapers by profit-oriented corporations, the rise of Conrad Black, and the danger that these trends pose to the long-term survival of the daily press. Miller takes us on a fascinating journey from the editorial offices of the big daily newspapers, where he once worked, to a small town, Shawville, Quebec, where he went to try and re-capture the essence of how journalism should serve society.

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  • Challenge and Change

    A History Of The Dalhousie School Of Nursing, 1949-1989

    By Peter Twohig     December 1997

    Challenge and Change offers an innovative perspective on Dalhousie University School of Nursing’s first four decades of growth and transition. This book draws on rich archival sources and oral interviews to critically examine the school. Its analysis is highly relevant to contemporary debates within the history of nursing and the education of nurse practitioners. Most importantly, this book situates university nursing schools within their many and varied contexts of community, health care and university. Co-published with Dalhousie

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  • L’sitkuk

    The Story of the Bear River Mi’kmaw Community

    By Darlene A. Ricker     January 1997

    L’sitkuk (pronounced elsetkook) is the original name for the Bear River Mi’kmaw community, which is part of the Mi’kmaw First Nation. Nestled close to the Bear River watershed, this tiny native community is regaining its culture, language and identity after hundreds of years of colonialism and assimilation. Living in the area for thousands of years, they were among the first people in Canada to have continuous contact with non-natives.

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    A Roseway Book