Kelly Gorkoff

Carleton

Kelly Gorkoff is a faculty member in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Winnipeg and a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University. She is the author of Being Heard: The Experiences of Young Women in Prostitution (2003).

  • Thinking About Justice

    A Book of Readings

    Edited by Kelly Gorkoff and Richard Jochelson     March 2012

    How do we think about justice? Is it an act? An ideology? A philosophy? We are divided in our understandings of justice between those who seek fundamental social change versus those who seek incremental change and between those who argue that justice exists versus those who think it is a ruse – between internal and external perspectives. However, a promising axis of scholarship aimed at bridging these divides is emerging. Thinking about Justice introduces readers to these three ways of thinking about justice in a variety of contexts including prisons, policing, the courts, youth crime, Aboriginal people, the media, poverty and work in the sex industry. Ultimately, Thinking about Justice seeks to embrace the potentialities of justice, to explore the avenues through which justice seekers interact, debate and achieve some mode of cohesion and find a new, inclusive way forward.

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  • Being Heard

    The Experiences of Young Women in Prostitution

    Edited by Kelly Gorkoff and Jane Runner     December 2002

    Being Heard examines, from their own perspectives and experiences, the lives of young women sexually exploited through prostitution. Putting their voices in the centre of its analysis, the book tries to help us more fully understand the experiences of girls exploited through prostitution, the complex issues of sex trade work and the ways to best respond to the issues. Beginning with a discussion of what little we know about youth prostitution, subsequent chapters address young women’s experiences with community and government programs, issues of self-identity, health and safety concerns, experiences of violence, factors that push young women into and may draw them out of sex trade work, and the effectiveness of Canadian legislation in coming to the aid of young prostitutes.